Agenda: Week of March 23 - March 27, 2015

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 6: The Most Recent Century, 1914 - 2010
Chapter 21: Collapse & Recovery of Europe
World War II
Week at a Glance:
MON - Guernica Painting - Meaning & Impact; Introduction: WWII - The War Begins; Crash Course WH WWII; Hitler Takes Europe; Japan Takes Asian Pacific; Hitler's 2 Great Mistakes; Ferguson's "Killing Space" Documentary; WWII Motivations
TUE - 1942- The Year WWII Begins to Turn; Stalingrad, D-Day (44); Victory in Europe; 
WED/THUPearl Harbor Article: Due in Class completed - Discussion; The Pacific War: Victory in Japan. Discuss the Holocaust & Use of Atomic Weapon to end WWII.
FRI - Quiz Chapter 22 - World Communism, Rise & Fall.

Article on Pearl Harbor is due on Wed/Thu: Pearl Harbor Article 
Quiz Friday - Chapter 22
TEST OVER Chapter 21 & 22 is next Thursday
Some call it the greatest documentary of all-time. It is certainly the most forceful propaganda film in history.
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Learning Targets:
 •  To examine the history of Europe between 1914 and the 1970s as an organic whole made up of closely interconnected parts
 •  To consider the repercussions of nationalism and colonialism in Europe and Japan
 •  To increase student awareness of the effects of the two world wars
 •  To help students imagine the appeal of totalitarian movements in the twentieth century 

Essential Questions:
BIG PICTURE QUESTIONS
      1.   What explains the disasters that befell Europe in the first half of the twentieth century?
      2.   In what ways were the world wars a motor for change in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   To what extent were the two world wars distinct and different conflicts, and in what ways were they related to each other? In particular, how did the First World War and its aftermath lay the foundations for World War II?
      4.   In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Margin Review Questions
      1.   What aspects of Europe’s nineteenth-century history contributed to the First World War?
      2.   In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
      4.   In what ways did fascism challenge the ideas and practices of European liberalism and democracy?
      5.   What was distinctive about the German expression of fascism? What was the basis of popular support for the Nazis?
      6.   How did Japan’s experience during the 1920s and 1930s resemble that of Germany, and how did it differ?
      7.   In what way were the origins of World War II in Asia and in Europe similar to each other? How were they different?
      8.   How did World War II differ from World War I?
      9.   How was Europe able to recover from the devastation of war?
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Monday, March 23, 2015
Quote: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." - Winston Churchill (speaking about the Royal Air Force)

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Look at the screen and write down in your notes what you see. What do you think this painting represents and means? Guernica Painting - Discuss Meaning & Impact
Guernica by Pablo Picasso
2. Crash Course World History #38: World War II (10 min) Answer the How is World War II different from World War I? on a sheet of paper as you watch Crash Course. 
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: Introduction to World War II - War Begins.
Hitler’s vision of lebensraum. (War of the World: Killing Space by Ferguson)
Appeasement; Blitzkrieg
Fall of France; Battle of Britain
Hitler Takes Continental Europe; 
Japan Takes Asian Pacific; 
Hitler's 2 Great Mistakes

Assignments:
Pearl Harbor Article 
Quiz Friday - Chapter 22
Chapter 21 & 22: Test next Thursday 
The Battle of Britain: German Luftwaffe vs. the British RAF
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Tuesday, March 24, 2015
Quote“We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out.” - Winston Churchill

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: 
2. Documentary Video: Ferguson's War of the World - Killing Space
In 1942, the 20th Century teetered on a knife-edge. It was the year when the whole world map appeared to have been redrawn by the Axis powers.
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: 
1942- The Year WWII Begins to Turn; Stalingrad, D-Day (44); Victory in Europe; 

Assignments:
Pearl Harbor Article 
Quiz Friday - Chapter 22
Chapter 21 & 22: Test next Thursday 
"Motherland Calls" - Russian statue as tribute to those who fell at Stalingrad, 1942-1943.
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Wednesday, March 25th & Thursday, March 26th, 2015
Quote: "December 7th, 1941... a day that shall live in infamy." - President Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Prepare article: Pearl Harbor Article 
2. Discuss Pearl Harbor Article & Notes, Video over Pearl Harbor
Mr. Duez's Trip to Pearl Harbor & 
War in the Pacific (Video: Making of The Pacific Anatomy of a War - HBO)
4. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Victory in Europe
Stalingrad & Operation Torch
D-Day Invasion & Victory in Europe
5. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Victory in Japan - Nature of the fighting Island hopping; terribly brutal & deadly; finished with horrifying Atomic Weapon and final Japanese Surrender as Soviets & Americans were poised to possibly invade

Review WWII: 
War Begins: Japanese Invasion of Manchuria & China, 1931, 1937; Japanese Imperialism takes complete control of Asian Pacific Rim; German Blitzkrieg, 1939-1940 - Hitler takes continent of Europe from France to Russia 
Battle of Britain 1940;
Escalation of War in 1941: German Invasion of USSR - Operation Barbarossa, June 1941; Japanese Bomb Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941 
Battle of Stalingrad, 1942-43; Operation Torch 1942 (Africa/Italy Invasions); Battle of Kursk (Eastern Front's D-Day Push) & D-Day June 6, 1944
US/Allies--> Push to Germany <--USSR
VE-Day: Victory in Europe, Jan. 1945
 
Asian Theatre of War: - Island Hopping Attacks by US/Allies against Japan.
Pearl Harbor, Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal, Leyte Gulf, Mariana Islands, Cape Gloucester, Peleliu, Iwo Jima, Okinawa - all major Pacific Battles. Brutal combat, inhospitable conditions, an enemy that would not surrender and fought to the last man for their emperor. Aug. 6 & Aug. 9, 1945 -
Atomic Bombs Dropped by US on JapanVJ-Day: Victory Against Japan, August 1945
Questions for Discussion:
  • What were the 2 main mistakes that Hitler made?
  • Which battles in each theater of war proved most decisive & important?
  • What was the impact on civilian populations?
  • Did the United States make the right decision to drop the bomb on Japan? (Was it much different than the near total destruction of many German cities throughout the course of the war?) How could you argue for the decision? How could you argue against it?
Assignment for Friday: 
Quiz Friday - Chapter 22
Test next Thursday - Chapter 21 & 22
The Pacific Theater of War was brutal. 
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Friday, March 27, 2015
Quote: "Communism is not love. Communism is a hammer which we use to crush the enemy." - Mao Zedong

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Prepare for the Quiz
2. Quiz Chapter 22
3. Review Quiz Chapter 22

Assignments:
Chapter 21 & 22: Test next Thursday

Agenda: Week of March 16 - March 20, 2015

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 6: Most Recent Century, 1900 - 2013
Chapter 21: Collapse & Recovery of Europe, 1914 - 1979
First World War; Great Depression; Rise of Dictators & Authoritarian Rule
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - WWI: Causes, Impact, & Course of the War
TUE -  Nature of WWI: Trench Warfare; Conclusion, Aftermath, & Consequences of 'Great War'
WED/THU - Roaring 20's -> Great Depression; Rise of Dictators in Europe; Video: Schama's Power of Art: Guernica; Intro to WWII: Causes, Impact, & Course of the War (Compare to WWI)
FRI -  Reading Check Quiz CH 21; Review Quiz CH 21; Pick up Article due on Wed/Thu next week
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It sure seemed like it was going to be fun. Woops.
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Monday, March 16, 2015
Quote"History is a myth that men agree to believe." - Napoleon

Learning Targets for Chapter 21—The Collapse and Recovery of Europe, 1914–1970s
 •  To examine the history of Europe between 1914 and the 1970s as an organic whole made up of closely interconnected parts
 •  To consider the repercussions of nationalism and colonialism in Europe and Japan
 •  To increase student awareness of the effects of the two world wars
 •  To help students imagine the appeal of totalitarian movements in the twentieth century 

BIG PICTURE QUESTIONS:
      1.   What explains the disasters that befell Europe in the first half of the twentieth century?
      2.   In what ways were the world wars a motor for change in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   To what extent were the two world wars distinct and different conflicts, and in what ways were they related to each other? In particular, how did the First World War and its aftermath lay the foundations for World War II?
      4.   In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Margin Review Questions:
      1.   What aspects of Europe’s nineteenth-century history contributed to the First World War?
      2.   In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
      4.   In what ways did fascism challenge the ideas and practices of European liberalism and democracy?
      5.   What was distinctive about the German expression of fascism? What was the basis of popular support for the Nazis?
      6.   How did Japan’s experience during the 1920s and 1930s resemble that of Germany, and how did it differ?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: What aspects of Europe's 19th century history contributed to the First World War?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: First World War: European Civilization in Crisis. Causes, development, and historic difference from wars past.

MAIN - Causes of WWI: 
Militarism
Alliances
Industry/Imperialism
Nationalism
* plus assassination of Archduke FF

Assignments: 
Quiz on Friday - Chapter 21
Read the chapter, take notes, read through my posted notes, watch Crash Course.
Crash Course: WWI - The Great War?
Crash Course: How WWI Started
Crash Course: Who Started WWI
Crash Course World War II
Crash Course A War For Resources - World War II
Sassoon captured the horrors of The Great War like few could.
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Tuesday, March 17, 2015
QuoteQuote: "The war has ruined us for everything." - Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front  

Learning Targets for Chapter 21—The Collapse and Recovery of Europe, 1914–1970s
 •  To examine the history of Europe between 1914 and the 1970s as an organic whole made up of closely interconnected parts
 •  To consider the repercussions of nationalism and colonialism in Europe and Japan
 •  To increase student awareness of the effects of the two world wars
 •  To help students imagine the appeal of totalitarian movements in the twentieth century 

BIG PICTURE QUESTIONS:
      1.   What explains the disasters that befell Europe in the first half of the twentieth century?
      2.   In what ways were the world wars a motor for change in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   To what extent were the two world wars distinct and different conflicts, and in what ways were they related to each other? In particular, how did the First World War and its aftermath lay the foundations for World War II?
      4.   In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Margin Review Questions:
      1.   What aspects of Europe’s nineteenth-century history contributed to the First World War?
      2.   In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
      4.   In what ways did fascism challenge the ideas and practices of European liberalism and democracy?
      5.   What was distinctive about the German expression of fascism? What was the basis of popular support for the Nazis?
      6.   How did Japan’s experience during the 1920s and 1930s resemble that of Germany, and how did it differ?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: What was trench warfare like on the Western Front? Describe the sight, sounds, and feel of how it must have been.
2. Trench Warfare Simulation.
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: End of the War; Aftermath; Repercussions of a failed peace.
Video clip from Andrew Marr's Making of Modern Britain: The Great War
Andrew Marr's A History of the World: Industry, minute 47:11 to End

Assignments: 
Quiz on Friday - Chapter 21
Read the chapter, take notes, read through my posted notes, watch Crash Course.
Crash Course: WWI - The Great War?
Crash Course: How WWI Started
Crash Course: Who Started WWI
Crash Course World War II
Crash Course A War For Resources - World War II
Guernica by Pablo Picasso
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Wednesday, March 18 & Thursday, March 19, 2015
Quote:
Learning Targets for Chapter 21—The Collapse and Recovery of Europe, 1914–1970s
 •  To examine the history of Europe between 1914 and the 1970s as an organic whole made up of closely interconnected parts
 •  To consider the repercussions of nationalism and colonialism in Europe and Japan
 •  To increase student awareness of the effects of the two world wars
 •  To help students imagine the appeal of totalitarian movements in the twentieth century 

BIG PICTURE QUESTIONS:
      1.   What explains the disasters that befell Europe in the first half of the twentieth century?
      2.   In what ways were the world wars a motor for change in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   To what extent were the two world wars distinct and different conflicts, and in what ways were they related to each other? In particular, how did the First World War and its aftermath lay the foundations for World War II?
      4.   In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Margin Review Questions:
      1.   What aspects of Europe’s nineteenth-century history contributed to the First World War?
      2.   In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
      4.   In what ways did fascism challenge the ideas and practices of European liberalism and democracy?
      5.   What was distinctive about the German expression of fascism? What was the basis of popular support for the Nazis?
      6.   How did Japan’s experience during the 1920s and 1930s resemble that of Germany, and how did it differ?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
2. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Roaring 20s, Great Depression, & Rise of Dictators.
3. Video w/Questions & Discussion at end: Power of Art: Picasso's Guernica
Video Questions for Power of Art Picasso's Guernica
Mr. Duez will show 10-20 minutes of the video and we'll discuss the impact of art on war and peace. Is Guernica propaganda?
Agree or disagree: Great art can instruct us on the obligations of being human. Explain your answer.
“Guernica is to painting what Beethoven's Ninth Symphony is to music: a cultural icon that speaks to mankind not only against war but also of hope and peace. It is a reference when speaking about genocide from El Salvador to Bosnia.” — Alejandro Escalona, on the 75th anniversary of the painting's creation
4. Introduction to World War II
Crash Course World War II
Crash Course A War For Resources - World War II

Assignments: 
Quiz on Friday - Chapter 21
Read the chapter, take notes, read through my posted notes, watch Crash Course.
Crash Course: WWI - The Great War?
Crash Course: How WWI Started
Crash Course: Who Started WWI
Crash Course World War II
Crash Course A War For Resources - World War II
"Never before has so much been owed by so many to so few." - Winston Churchill
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Friday, March 20, 2015
Quote: "Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill

Learning Targets for Chapter 21—The Collapse and Recovery of Europe, 1914–1970s
 •  To examine the history of Europe between 1914 and the 1970s as an organic whole made up of closely interconnected parts
 •  To consider the repercussions of nationalism and colonialism in Europe and Japan
 •  To increase student awareness of the effects of the two world wars
 •  To help students imagine the appeal of totalitarian movements in the twentieth century 

BIG PICTURE QUESTIONS:
      1.   What explains the disasters that befell Europe in the first half of the twentieth century?
      2.   In what ways were the world wars a motor for change in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   To what extent were the two world wars distinct and different conflicts, and in what ways were they related to each other? In particular, how did the First World War and its aftermath lay the foundations for World War II?
      4.   In what ways did Europe’s internal conflicts between 1914 and 1945 have global implications?

Margin Review Questions:
      1.   What aspects of Europe’s nineteenth-century history contributed to the First World War?
      2.   In what ways did World War I mark new departures in the history of the twentieth century?
      3.   In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
      4.   In what ways did fascism challenge the ideas and practices of European liberalism and democracy?
      5.   What was distinctive about the German expression of fascism? What was the basis of popular support for the Nazis?
      6.   How did Japan’s experience during the 1920s and 1930s resemble that of Germany, and how did it differ?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: In what ways was the Great Depression a global phenomenon?
2. QUIZ: Reading Check Quiz - CH 21
3. Pick up Article (due next Wed/Thu):  Remembering Pearl Harbor by Gladis Smith (Looking back at the book 'At Dawn We Slept' by Gordon W. Prange.)
4. Review Quiz CH 21

Assignments: 
Article due on Wed/Thu next week: Remembering Pearl Harbor by Gladis Smith (Looking back at the book 'At Dawn We Slept' by Gordon W. Prange.)
Chapter 22 quiz next Friday - World Communism

The War of the World, Episode 1: Clash of Empires

VIDEO: The War of the World, Episode 1: Clash of Empires

Questions to answer while viewing the video

Niall Ferguson's video series concerning the wars of the 20th century.

The series considers the unparalleled stretch of violence as a single, unrelenting “war of the world” that began with Japan’s invasion of Russia in 1904 and continued through the Korean War all the way to an ongoing “Third World’s War.”

Episode one, The Clash of Empires, posits that economic volatilityethnic conflict and empires in crisis combined to spawn the 20th century’s bloodiest conflicts, leading to the rise of the brutal regimes of Germany, Japan and Russia, the “age of genocide” and a preoccupation with racial purity.
The houses caved in as they dissolved at its touch, and darted out flames; the trees changed to fire with a roar . . . So you understand the roaring wave of fear that swept through the greatest city in the world just as Monday was dawning - the stream of flight rising swiftly to a torrent, lashing in a foaming tumult round the railway stations . . . Did they dream they might exterminate us?H. G. Wells, The War of the Worlds
Ferguson compares "The War of the Worlds" to what he calls a "War of the World":
When I was a schoolboy, the history textbooks offered a variety of explanations for twentieth-century violence. 
Sometimes they related it to economic crisis, as if depressions and recessions could explain political conflict. A favourite device was to relate the rise of unemployment in Weimar Germany to the rise of the Nazi vote and Adolf Hitler's 'seizure' of power, which in turn was supposed to explain the Second World War. But, I came to wonder, might not rapid economic growth sometimes have been just as destabilizing as economic crisis? Then there was the theory that the century was all about class conflict - that revolutions were one of the main causes of violence. But were not ethnic divisions actually more important than the supposed struggle between proletariat and bourgeoisie? 
Another argument was that the twentieth century's problems were the consequences of extreme versions of political ideologies, notably communism (extreme socialism) and fascism (extreme nationalism), as well as earlier evil 'isms', notably imperialism. But what about the role of traditional systems like religions, or of other apparently non-political ideas and assumptions that nevertheless had violent implications? 
And just who was fighting the twentieth century's wars? In the books I read as a boy, the leading roles were always played by nation states: Britain, Germany, France, Russia, the United States and so on. But was it not the case that some or all of these polities were in some measure multinational rather than national - were, indeed, empires rather than states? 
Above all, the old history books told the story of the twentieth century as a kind of protracted, painful but ultimately pleasing triumph of the West. The heroes (Western democracies) were confronted by a succession of villains (the Germans, the Japanese, the Russians) but ultimately good always triumphed over evil. The world wars and the Cold War were thus morality plays on a global stage. But were they? And did the West really win the hundred years war that was the twentieth century?
Love him or loathe him, you have to give Ferguson his due. He does his research. He takes a stand. He is a historian.

Agenda: Week - March 2-6, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 5 - European Moment, 1750-1914
Chapter 19 - China, Ottomans, Japan: Internal Trouble, External Threats
Chapter 20 - Colonial Encounters (Africa, India, Asia)
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - Quiz CH 20; Review CH 20 Quiz - Discuss Colonial Encounters
TUE - Impact of Imperialism: Education, Religion, Race/Tribe
WED/THU - TEST CH 19, 20; DBQ - African Scramble
FRI - Article Due - WWI; Ferguson's The War of the World, Episode I
A Quiet Little Game. Caption: "CHORUS: I wonder what card Uncle Sam has in his hand?"
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LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?
"English Methods of Colonizing Africa," a German view of the British Empire, 19th c. 
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Monday, March 2, 2015
Quote: "Never cut a tree down in the wintertime. Never make a negative decision in the low time. Never make your most important decisions when you are in your worst moods. Wait. Be patient. The storm will pass. The spring will come." - Robert H. Schuller

LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?


Agenda:
1. QUIZ Chapter 20. 
...after the quiz... 
DO NOW: In what different ways did the colonial takeover of Asia and Africa occur?
2. Review CH 20 quiz

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Tuesday, March 3, 2015
Quote: “Take up one idea. Make that one idea your life – think of it, dream of it, live on that idea. Let the brain, muscles, nerves, every part of your body, be full of that idea, and just leave every other idea alone. This is the way to success.”Swami Vivekananda

LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?


Agenda:
1. DO NOW: How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
What is Ferguson's thesis? 
Do you agree?
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: Education, Religion, Race/Tribe
What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?
In what way were “race” and “tribe” new identities in colonial Africa?
4. (if time permits) Review CH 19 & 20

Watch the YouTube Video lectures over Chapter 19 & 20. Study the notes
Read Strayer. Go to the Companion Site and do quiz and tests. 
This CH 19 & 20 test is super important as far as the AP Test goes. 
It is a favorite topic of the College Board.
From the Cape to Cairo', Puck, 1902. 
Britannia leads civilizing soldiers and colonists against Africans as Civilization conquers Barbarism. (I guess... )
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Wednesday, March 4th & Thursday, March 5th, 2015
Quote:  ”A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him.” David Brinkley

Agenda
1. DO NOW: Prep For Ch. 19 & 20 Test.
2. CH. 19 & 20 Test; including DBQ: African Scramble
Niall Ferguson in front of an image of the Trenches of World War One.
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Friday, March 6, 2015
Quote: "Spring is nature's way of saying, 'Let's party!'"  
-Robin Williams

Learning Targets & Discussion Questions:
  • Are these wars (really beginning with the Russo-Japanese War) just a long and continuous Wars of the 20th Century? 
  • What motives for war does Ferguson posit?
  • Do you agree with Ferguson that racial animosity was exploited by nations for gain and profit? 
Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up the video questions for Part 1 of War of the World, by Ferguson
2. Video Study: Niall Ferguson's The War of the World
The series begins with how the first World War ignited fires of racial animosity in people, exploited by new and more terrible nation-states that were far more preoccupied with national and racial purity. It was the beginning of an age of genocide.
Video Questions & Viewing Guide. Will collect answers at the end of the period.
Discussion and introduction of World War I. 

ASSIGNMENT:Quiz for Chapter 21 is Monday when we return from spring break.


HAVE A GREAT BREAK!

Mr. Duez will be out on Monday, Feb. 23, 2015

I am writing tonight to let you know that I have just put in for a sub and done my sub plans. I am going to be in school before anyone arrives tomorrow to setup for the sub. The classroom should be good to go. Please, please, please help the sub. It means a great deal to me that the substitute has a good day. Remember, I always have a sub take my job because I am prepared and because my students are fantastic. It means a lot. My job filled in less than 1 hour this evening. 

In World History, you will watch an episode of Mankind The Story of Us. It is a decent video that will help you see the impact of industry, globalization, and the modern world. Take notes and the sub will collect them for a grade

The quiz for Chapter 19 will be on Tuesday. Those who need to make up the CCOT, you can do that on Wed-Thu this week in class. You'll get 30 minutes as the kids did last Friday.


As a family we are going through an incredibly difficult time. Over the past week I have held in the tears while at work (mostly), however at home they flow often and our sadness is very painful. Our wonderful dog, Gryff has a terminal form of skin cancer. 

He is beginning to really feel the pain. As a dog lover and as a friend to my dog, I will not let him struggle with what will certainly be a horribly painful end of life. So tomorrow I am taking him to the vet so that they can administer drugs to help him pass on and ease his pain.
My heart is broken in a million pieces. Many of which I will never be able to put back in place. This dog means a great deal to me. He was there for me during my toughest days. Saying goodbye to him is tearing me apart.

So please understand and be patient with me. He is really my best friend. I do not know what I am going to do without him in my life. He has a kinder heart than most of the humans I have ever met in this life. I have had to deal with this type of situation before. Most recently, last month with our 21-year old cat, Milo. But I have never felt this amount of pain, sadness, and horrible emotion for a pet passing. He is only 6 years-old. Gryff is truly a second son to me. And always will be.
The image above is on the back wall under the clock in our classroom

Agenda: Week of Feb 23 - 27, 2015

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 5: THE EUROPEAN MOMENT IN WORLD HISTORY 1750-1914
CH 19 Internal Troubles, External Threats: China, the Ottoman Empire, & Japan 
& CH 20 Colonial Encounters
Week at a Glance:
MON - Quiz CH 19; Quiz Review
TUE - Notes, Video, Discussion: The British Empire; Ottoman Empire: Sick Man of Europe; Chinese Self-Strengthening (not); Japanese Meiji Restoration. 
WED/TH - Imperialism - The British Empire & the world's reaction; DBQ Skills Practice: The African Scramble
FRI - Colonial Conquests & Imperialism: Notes, Video, & Questions to discuss.
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Quiz - CH 20 next Monday
TEST - Next Wed/Thu CH 19 & 20 
DBQ - The African Scramble will be on the test.
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Monday, February 23, 2015
Quote: "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 19 Targets:
• To make students aware of the refocusing of racism in the nineteenth-century West
• To examine the effects of Western dominance on the empires of Asia
• To explore the reasons behind the collapse of the Chinese and Ottoman empires
The British Empire Rises
• To investigate the reasons for Japan’s rise to its position as an industrial superpower and to compare Japan’s experience with that of China 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 19 Essential Questions:
1. What differences can you identify in how China, the Ottoman Empire, and Japan experienced Western imperialism and confronted it? How might you account for those differences?
2. In what ways did the Industrial Revolution shape the character of nineteenth-century European imperialism?
3. “The response of each society to European imperialism grew out of its larger historical development and its internal problems.” What evidence might support this statement?
4. What accounts for the massive peasant rebellions of nineteenth-century China?
5. How did Western pressures stimulate change in China during the nineteenth century?
6. What lay behind the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century?
7. How did Japan’s historical development differ from that of China and the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth century?

Agenda:
1. Do Now - Prep for the Quiz. Then Quiz Ch 19.
2. Review Quiz Ch 19 - Internal Struggles; External Threats
3. If extra time: Crash Course: Crash Course World History Nationalism: Samurai, Daimyo, & Matthew Perry
'The Sick Man of Europe' - The Ottoman Empire's final days.
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Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Quote"Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn't." - Erica Jong

LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 19 Targets:
• To make students aware of the refocusing of racism in the nineteenth-century West
• To examine the effects of Western dominance on the empires of Asia
• To explore the reasons behind the collapse of the Chinese and Ottoman empires
• To investigate the reasons for Japan’s rise to its position as an industrial superpower and to compare Japan’s experience with that of China 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 19 Essential Questions:
1. What differences can you identify in how China, the Ottoman Empire, and Japan experienced Western imperialism and confronted it? How might you account for those differences?
2. In what ways did the Industrial Revolution shape the character of nineteenth-century European imperialism?
3. “The response of each society to European imperialism grew out of its larger historical development and its internal problems.” What evidence might support this statement?
4. What accounts for the massive peasant rebellions of nineteenth-century China?
5. How did Western pressures stimulate change in China during the nineteenth century?
6. What lay behind the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century?
7. How did Japan’s historical development differ from that of China and the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth century?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: “The response of each society to European imperialism grew out of its larger historical development and its internal problems.” What evidence might support this statement?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Colonial Impact on the world. Did Britain "Make" the Modern World? Was colonialism a 'good' in the end? Or should we view it from the obvious evils that were perpetrated on the colonized peoples of that time? 
Carving Up the Pie of China: French cartoon from the late 1890s, the Great Powers of the day participate in dividing China, while a Chinese figure behind them tries helplessly to stop the partition of his country.
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Wednesday, February 25 & Thursday, February 26, 2015
Quote"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix

Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Watch Crash Course WH: Imperialism. Answer these questions:
A. Why did China have a favorable balance of trade with Britain until the Taiping Rebellion?
B. What two factors drove imperialism?  Which one does Green claim was a more powerful and why?  
C. What prevented the Europeans from colonizing Africa before the nineteenth century?
D. What technologies facilitated Europe’s domination of Africa?
E. Why did most European powers use indirect rule to control their colonies?
F. How did business imperialism compare to political imperialism? How does the legacy of business imperialism affect Americans today?
Discuss.
2. Document Based Question Study. Students will work in groups to break down the question for Friday's DBQ Posters:
African reactions to Scramble for AfricaUsing the documents, analyze African actions and reactions in response to the European Scramble for Africa. Identify an additional type of document and explain how it would help in assessing African actions and reactions.
The Berlin Conference: The Carving Up of Africa, 1884
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Friday, March 27, 2015
Quote: "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: How would you group the Scramble for Africa documents? Why? 
2. DBQ Posters - Scramble for Africa: In groups, create DBQ Posters for the Scramble for Africa. 
3. If time, present posters to class.
What will your WHAP T-Shirt be? It is time to start planning.