Agenda: Week of Sept 29 - Oct 3, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 2: Classical Era - Eurasian Empires, 500 BCE to 500 CE
Chapters 4, 5, and 6: Eurasian Empires, Cultural Traditions, & Social Inequalities
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - CH 5 Reading Check Quiz; Review Quiz; Discuss Secularism
TUE - Andrew Marr's History of the World, Part 3: "The Sword & the Word"
WED/THU - Hinduism & Buddhism; Slavery; Document Analysis
FRI - Caste (India) and Class (China) compared; Document Analysis Han China & Roman Empire
"We made the buttons on the screen look so good 
you'll want to lick them." - Steve Jobs
__________________________________________
Monday, Sept 29, 2014
Quote"Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life." - Confucius

Learning Targets:
★ Explain the enormous influence on world history of the religious and cultural traditions developed in the classical world
★ Analyze the reasons behind the development of these religious and cultural traditions
★ Compare the common ground and significant differences between these religious and cultural traditions and examine possible reasons behind them

Essential Questions:
1. “Religions are fundamentally alike.” Does the material in this chapter support or undermine this idea?
2. What different answers to the problem of disorder arose in classical China?
3. Why has Confucianism been defined as a “humanistic philosophy” rather than a supernatural religion?
4. How did the Daoist outlook differ from that of Confucianism?
5. In what ways did the religious traditions of South Asia change over the centuries?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Reading Check Quiz for Chapter 5. Prepare your handwritten notes (copying the terms and definitions on the target sheet is a great idea!)
2. Quiz: Reading Check Quiz for Chapter 5.
3. Review Quiz
4. Discuss the question: “Is a secular outlook on the world an essentially modern phenomenon, or does it have precedents in the classical era?”

Assignments:
Quiz next Monday, Oct. 7 CH 6;
Test for Unit 2 is on Wed/Thu, Oct 9/10
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.
Confucius say... because he never wrote.
Like Jesus after him, his followers did.
__________________________________________
Tuesday, Sept 30, 2014
Quote: "Worry a little bit every day and in a lifetime you will lose a couple of years. If something is wrong, fix it if you can. But train yourself not to worry. Worry never fixes anything." - Mary Hemingway

Learning Targets
:

★ Explain the enormous influence on world history of the religious and cultural traditions developed in the classical world
★ Analyze the reasons behind the development of these religious and cultural traditions
★ Compare the common ground and significant differences between these religious and cultural traditions and examine possible reasons behind them

Essential Questions:
1. “Religion is a double-edged sword, both supporting and undermining political authority and social elites.” How would you support both sides of this statement?
2. How would you define the appeal of the religious/cultural traditions discussed in this chapter? To what groups were they attractive, and why?
3. What different answers to the problem of disorder arose in classical China?
4. How would you compare the lives and teachings of Jesus and the Buddha? In what different ways did the two religions evolve after the deaths of their founders?
5. In what ways was Christianity transformed in the five centuries following the death of Jesus?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up questions from the front of the classroom for Video.
2. Video Study: Andrew Marr's History of the World, Part 3: "The Word & the Sword" first 40 minutes
India - Ashoka - Buddhist leader teaches tolerance in India from the throne
China - Ying Zheng (Qin Shi Huang) - China's first emperor, referred to by Marr as Ying Zheng. Ying was his ancestral name. Zheng (pronounced: Cheng) his given name.
Roman Empire - Julius Caesar - Great general turned megalomaniac.
Egypt - Cleopatra - Last of the great Egyptian power players.
Jerusalem - Saul becomes Paul - A great critic is reborn to preach Christianity in Rome
Rome & Carthage - Perpetua - a Christian martyr sparks a religious explosion
Assignments:
Quiz next Monday, Oct. 7 CH 6;
Test for Unit 2 is on Wed/Thu, Oct 9/10
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.

__________________________________________
Wednesday, Oct 1, 2014 & Thursday, Oct 2, 2014
Quote"To know, is to know that you know nothing. That is the meaning of true knowledge." - Socrates

Learning Targets
:

★ Analyze social structures in classical Eurasia
★ Compare the causes of differences in social structures in different civilizations
★ Describe the nature of classical patriarchy and its variations

Essential Questions:
1. “Social inequality was both accepted and resisted in classical civilizations.” What evidence might support this statement?
2. How would you describe the social hierarchy of classical China?
3. What class conflicts disrupted Chinese society?
4. What set of ideas underlies India’s caste-based society?
5. What is the difference between varna and jati as expressions of classical India’s caste system?
6. How did India’s caste system differ from China’s class system?
7. How did Greco-Roman slavery differ from that of other classical civilizations?
8. In what ways did the expression of Chinese patriarchy change over time, and why did it change?
9. How did the patriarchies of Athens and Sparta differ from each other?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Compare the Cultural Traditions of India: Hinduism & Buddhism.
2. Notes & Discussion:  “Religion is a double-edged sword, both supporting and undermining political authority and social elites.” How would you support both sides of this statement? 
3. Notes & DiscussionWhy was slavery so much more prominent in Greco-Roman civilization than in India or China?
4. Document Analysis: Analyze the responses to the spread of Buddhism in China.
5. Grouping, Analysis, & Thesis: We will use cooperative groups to discuss document analysis and prepare to write a thesis statement as a class.

Assignments:
Quiz next Monday, Oct. 7 CH 6;
Test for Unit 2 is on Wed/Thu, Oct 9/10
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.
"Quemadmoeum gladis nemeinum occidit, occidentis telum est"  - By Seneca.
"A sword is never a killer, it is a tool in a killer's hand"
Roman version of  "Guns don't kill people."
__________________________________________
Friday, Oct 3, 2014
Quote:  "Common sense and a sense of humor are the same thing, moving at different speeds. A sense of humor is just common sense, dancing." - William James, American psychologist and philosopher (1842 - 1910)

Learning Targets
:

★ Analyze social structures in classical Eurasia
★ Compare the causes of differences in social structures in different civilizations
★ Describe the nature of classical patriarchy and its variations

Essential Questions:
1. “Social inequality was both accepted and resisted in classical civilizations.” What evidence might support this statement?
2. How would you describe the social hierarchy of classical China?
3. What class conflicts disrupted Chinese society?
4. What set of ideas underlies India’s caste-based society?
5. What is the difference between varna and jati as expressions of classical India’s caste system?
6. How did India’s caste system differ from China’s class system?
7. How did Greco-Roman slavery differ from that of other classical civilizations?
8. In what ways did the expression of Chinese patriarchy change over time, and why did it change?
9. How did the patriarchies of Athens and Sparta differ from each other?

Agenda:
1. Do Now: What was the difference between the systems of Chinese Class and Indian Caste?
2. Notes & DiscussionHow did the patriarchies of Athens and Sparta differ from one another?
3. Document Analysis: Analyze the responses to the Han & Roman Attitudes towards technology
4. Grouping, Analysis, & Thesis: We will use cooperative groups to discuss document analysis and prepare to write a thesis statement as a class.

Assignments:
Quiz next Monday, Oct. 7 CH 6;
Test for Unit 2 is on Wed/Thu, Oct 9/10
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.

Agenda: Week of Sept 24 - Sept 28, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 2 - Strayer Chapters 4, 5, 6, & 7
Classical Age
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - Reading Check Quiz CH 4; Review Quiz; Discuss FRQ Comparative
TUE - Andrew Marr's History of the World Episode 2: Empire; Video Questions & Discussion
WED/THU - What is Empire? Eurasian Empires Clash; Dawn of Democracy - Golden Age
FRI - Turn in FRQ Comparative Essay. Socratic Group discussion - Chapter 5 Big Picture Questions.
_________________________________________________
Monday, Sept 22, 2014
Quote: Quote: "In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on." - Robert Frost

Learning Targets:
★ Define the characteristics of imperial systems in the classical era and analyze why empires developed in some regions but not in others.
★ Compare the important similarities and differences between imperial systems and the reasons behind them
★ Explain the significance that classical empires have for us today, such as, representative government, military power, etc.
★ Evaluate the “greatness” of the Roman Empire and China’s Han Dynasty and determine if their destructive and oppressive features outweighed their impressive advances.

Essential Questions:
1. What common features can you identify in the empires described in this chapter?
2. In what ways did these empires differ from one another? What accounts for those differences?
3. Are you more impressed with the “greatness” of empires or with their destructive and oppressive features? Why?
4. Why did semi democratic governments emerge in some of the Greek city-states?
5. What were the consequences for both sides of the encounter between the Persians and the Greeks
6. What changes did Alexander’s conquests bring in their wake?
7. How did Rome grow from a single city to the center of a huge empire?
8. How and why did the making of the Chinese empire differ from that of the Roman Empire?
9. In comparing the Roman and Chinese empires, which do you find more striking—their similarities or their differences?
10. How did the collapse of empire play out differently in the Roman world and in China?
11. Why were centralized empires so much less prominent in India than in China?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Reading Check Quiz over Chapter 4: Eurasian Empires (you may use your handwritten notes)
2. Reading Check Quiz - Chapter 4. (10 minutes)
3. Review Quiz. 
4. Discuss the FRQ Comparative Essay due on Friday. It will already be written by the beginning of class. If you do not have it completed, you will write it that period. There will be no late grades. If not done, it turns into a timed writing.

Assignment:
FRQ Comparative Essay is due Friday.
Quiz next Monday, Sep. 30: CH 5
Test is on Wed/Thu, Oct 8/9
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.
The Greek term karyatides literally means "maidens of Karyai", an ancient town of Peloponnese.
Karyai had a famous temple dedicated to the goddess Artemis of Karyatis
__________________________________________________
Tuesday, Sept 25, 2014
Quote"The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases." - Carl Jung

Learning Targets:
★ Define the characteristics of imperial systems in the classical era and analyze why empires developed in some regions but not in others.
★ Compare the important similarities and differences between imperial systems and the reasons behind them
★ Explain the significance that classical empires have for us today, such as, representative government, military power, etc.
★ Evaluate the “greatness” of the Roman Empire and China’s Han Dynasty and determine if their destructive and oppressive features outweighed their impressive advances.

Essential Questions:
1. What common features can you identify in the empires described in this chapter?
2. In what ways did these empires differ from one another? What accounts for those differences?
3. Are you more impressed with the “greatness” of empires or with their destructive and oppressive features? Why?
4. Why did semi democratic governments emerge in some of the Greek city-states?
5. What were the consequences for both sides of the encounter between the Persians and the Greeks?
6. What changes did Alexander’s conquests bring in their wake?
7. How did Rome grow from a single city to the center of a huge empire?
8. How and why did the making of the Chinese empire differ from that of the Roman Empire?
9. In comparing the Roman and Chinese empires, which do you find more striking—their similarities or their differences?
10. How did the collapse of empire play out differently in the Roman world and in China?
11. Why were centralized empires so much less prominent in India than in China?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up questions from the front table for the video.
2. Video Study: Andrew Marr's History of the World: Episode 2 "Empire"
In this episode, Andrew Marr tells the story of the first empires which laid the foundations for the modern world. From the Assyrians to Alexander the Great, conquerors rampaged across the Middle East and vicious wars were fought all the way from China to the Mediterranean. But this time of chaos and destruction also brought enormous progress and inspired human development. 
In the Middle East, the Phoenicians invented the alphabet, and one of the most powerful ideas in world history emerged: the belief in just one God. In India, the Buddha offered a radical alternative to empire building—a way of living that had no place for violence or hierarchy and was open to everyone. Great thinkers from Socrates to Confucius proposed new ideas about how to rule more wisely and live in a better society. And in Greece, democracy was born—the greatest political experiment of all. 
But within just a few years, its future would be under threat from invasion by an empire in the east: Persia.
Assignment:
FRQ Comparative Essay is due Friday.
Quiz next Monday - CH 5
Test is on Wed/Thu, Oct 8/9
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.
Andrew Marr travels the globe in Episode 2, History of the World - Empires.
_____________________________________________
Wednesday, Sept 26, 2014 & Thursday, Sept 27 , 2014
Quote"Every man dies. Not every man really lives." - William Wallace

Learning Targets:
★ Define the characteristics of imperial systems in the classical era and analyze why empires developed in some regions but not in others.
★ Compare the important similarities and differences between imperial systems and the reasons behind them
★ Explain the significance that classical empires have for us today, such as, representative government, military power, etc.
★ Evaluate the “greatness” of the Roman Empire and China’s Han Dynasty and determine if their destructive and oppressive features outweighed their impressive advances.

Essential Questions:
1. What common features can you identify in the empires described in this chapter?
2. In what ways did these empires differ from one another? What accounts for those differences?
3. Are you more impressed with the “greatness” of empires or with their destructive and oppressive features? Why?
4. Why did semi democratic governments emerge in some of the Greek city-states?
5. What were the consequences for both sides of the encounter between the Persians and the Greeks
6. What changes did Alexander’s conquests bring in their wake?
7. How did Rome grow from a single city to the center of a huge empire?
8. How and why did the making of the Chinese empire differ from that of the Roman Empire?
9. In comparing the Roman and Chinese empires, which do you find more striking—their similarities or their differences?
10. How did the collapse of empire play out differently in the Roman world and in China?
11. Why were centralized empires so much less prominent in India than in China?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Write out your thesis for the FRQ prompt you are choosing for Friday. What evidence do you have to support that claim? What direct comparisons are you making? 
2. FRQ Analysis - The Comparative Essay (45 minutes of class)
Students will be placed in 5 groups. 
They will each have different samples of student work on the Comparative Essays. 
Students will use the rubric below to grade each sample and discuss in their groups. 

Assess & Discuss:
Thesis Statement (1)
Addresses all parts of the question (1), Fully (1)
Supports thesis with historical evidence (1), Fully (1)
Direct Comparisons (1)
Analysis of Comparisons (1)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Total for the Comparison FRQ: 7 Points

Example Prompt: 
Analyze the question. Remember you can't write the thesis without the evidence. 
We discussed this in class. Remember our example of Law & Order? You must have the detectives show up on the scene, gather evidence, analyze it, and then they can make a judgement about "Who done it!" Let the evidence you have gathered become your thesis. Don't make this harder than it is.
Example as used by JBartlett in the video referenced/linked below.
Notice that the picture above:
The student references the time period, 
Uses both/however to show similarities/differences.
Student does not get into great detail, but does have 2 similarities and 1 difference. And it is clear.

The thesis now organizes the entire essay: 
2 similarities
3 differences 

Body Paragraphs:
Start with a direct comparison in your Topic Sentence:
Then provide specific evidence - as much as possible to support the comparison.
Then get into analysis - WHY or HOW are they similar or difference (because, the reason for the similarity, due to the fact that, resulted in, etc.)
Notice: "The reason Rome used slaves..." --> analysis.
Body Paragraphs: Write as many body paragraphs as you can, 3-5 should be plenty.
Evidence: usually you need 7+ pieces of evidence and use facts from both places.
Direct comparisons: 3+ comparisons made in your paper.
Analysis: Try to explain the reasons for every comparison you make. You will need 2+ valid analyses for the point.

Remember, each body paragraph should TASC 
Each body paragraph should contain:
TASC:
Topic Sentence (direct comparison)
Analysis as to why the similarity/ difference existed
Support with 3 pieces of evidence 
Connect it to a larger global context or theme

3. Discuss FRQ Comparison Essay - Student Questions will drive this portion of class.
Good video to help you for Friday: AP World History Comparison Essay by JBartlett
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~SECOND HALF OF THE PERIOD~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
4. Notes, Video, & Discussion: We will watch segments from a few documentaries, text documents projected on the screen, and images/graphics.  (45 minutes of class)
Dawn of Democracy: Athens by Bettany Hughes
The Ancient Worlds: Athens the Truth About Democracy by Bettany Hughes
The Last Stand of the 300: True Story of the Spartans
Excerpts from "The Hemlock Cup" by Bettany Hughes
Video diary about The Hemlock Cup - Hughes Discusses Her Book

Discussion Questions: Dawn of Democracy - 
Why did semi democratic governments emerge in some of the Greek city-states? 

Questions we will consider:
A. Was the Golden Age actually "golden?"
B. How did democracy evolve?
C. What role did the arts play in the development of democracy?
D. The death of Democracy 1.0.
E. Socrates - the heart of democracy.
F. Did Alexander extend the Hellenistic Age? Or was it less of what we today consider to be "Greek ideals" and more of just an empire of typical proportions?

Assignment:
FRQ Comparative Essay is due Friday.
Quiz next Monday - CH 5
Test is on Wed/Thu, Oct 8/9
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.
1787 - Jacque Louis David paints "The Death of Socrates"
Socrates, as punishment for criticizing Critias, the tyrant of Athens, is told he must either drink the poison hemlock or face exile. Socrates, rather than fleeing, uses his death as a final lesson for his pupils, and faces it calmly.
__________________________________________________
Friday, Sept 28, 2014
Quote"All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on." - Henry Ellis

Learning Targets:
★ Explain the enormous influence on world history of the religious and cultural traditions developed in the classical world
★ Analyze the reasons behind the development of these religious and cultural traditions
★ Compare the common ground and significant differences between these religious and cultural traditions and examine possible reasons behind them 

Essential Questions:
1. “Religions are fundamentally alike.” Does the material in this chapter support or undermine this idea?
2. Is a secular outlook on the world an essentially modern phenomenon, or does it have precedents in the classical era?
3. “Religion is a double-edged sword, both supporting and undermining political authority and social elites.” How would you support both sides of this statement?
4.  How would you define the appeal of the religious/cultural traditions discussed in this chapter? To what groups were they attractive, and why?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: FRQ Comparative EssayPrepare FRQ Comparative Essay to turn in to Mr. Duez. If it is not finished, those students will have a timed writing this period to get it done. There will be no late grades. 
Question for Discussion: What does it mean to be "Chinese"?
2. Cooperative group discussion: Students will be in groups and will read Sun Tzu's The Art of War. Each group will have a different section. 
  • Students will read the section, discuss it. Summarize it. Figure out what that section is all about. 
  • What is Sun Tzu's "Point of View"
  • Then, discuss what The Art of War can tell us about Chinese thought.
  • Remember to think about such things as Legalism, Confucianism, Daoism, and even Buddhism. Could you label each section as being based upon one type of Chinese Cultural Tradition?
We will see clips from the video - YouTube: The Art of War, Sun Tzu - Documentary

3. Discussion - Full Class: Discuss each of the sections of Art of War while looking at the big picture questions for Chapter 5.

Assignment:
Quiz next Monday: CH 5
Test is on Wed/Thu, Oct 8/9
Check the notes, YouTube lectures, and work on the Target Sheets to prepare.

Agenda: Sept 15 - Sept 19, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 1 - First Humans, Farmers, & Civilizations
& Unit 2 - Eurasian Empires, 500 BCE - 500 CE
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON: Reading Check Quiz Chapter 3; Review Quiz; Crash Course
TUE: Unit 1 - Reviewing the big picture
WED/THU: TEST UNIT 1; Introduction to Unit 2, chapters 4, 5, 6, & 7
FRI: How to write the FRQ - The Comparative Essay
Yeah, it's kinda like that.
________________________________________
Monday, Sept 15, 2014
Quote"I was taught that the human brain was the crowning glory of evolution so far, but I think it's a very poor scheme for survival." - Kurt Vonnegut

Learning Targets:
★To establish the relationship between the First Civilizations and the Agricultural Revolution
★To contrast civilizations with other forms of human communities
★To explore when, where, and how the First Civilizations arose in human history
★To explore how the emergence of civilizations transformed how humans lived and how their societies were structured
★To show the various ways in which civilizations differed from one another
★To explore the outcomes of the emergence of civilizations, both positive and negative, for humankind

Essential Questions:
1. What distinguished civilizations from other forms of human community?
2. How does the use of the term “civilization” by historians differ from that of popular usage? How do you use the term?
3. “Civilizations were held together largely by force.” Do you agree with this assessment, or were there other mechanisms of integration as well? 
4. In the development of the First Civilizations, what was gained for humankind, and what was lost?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for the reading check quiz over Chapter 3. You can use your handwritten notes.
2. READING CHECK QUIZ - Chapter 3 - First Civilizations
3. Review the quiz
4. Crash Course World History: Indus River Valley Civilization

Assignment:
Test is Wed/Thu over Unit 1
Unit 1 FRQ is due on Friday Sept 26
Study the notes, YouTube lectures, Target Sheets, and information at this link for Unit 1
And they will probably last a little longer...
________________________________________
Tuesday, Sept 16, 2014
Quote"No matter how closely you examine the water, glucose, and electrolyte salts in the human brain, you can't find the point where these molecules became conscious." - Deepak Chopra
Learning Targets:
★To establish the relationship between the First Civilizations and the Agricultural Revolution
★To contrast civilizations with other forms of human communities
★To explore when, where, and how the First Civilizations arose in human history
★To explore how the emergence of civilizations transformed how humans lived and how their societies were structured
★To show the various ways in which civilizations differed from one another
★To explore the outcomes of the emergence of civilizations, both positive and negative, for humankind

Essential Questions:
1. What distinguished civilizations from other forms of human community?
2. How does the use of the term “civilization” by historians differ from that of popular usage? How do you use the term?
3. “Civilizations were held together largely by force.” Do you agree with this assessment, or were there other mechanisms of integration as well? 
4. In the development of the First Civilizations, what was gained for humankind, and what was lost?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: In what ways did Egypt and Mesopotamia differ from one another? (Also: How were the Indian and Chinese river valley civilizations similar/different?)
2. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Chapter 3 - Comparing the River Valley Civs
Crash Course World History: Mesopotamia
3. Test Prep: Multiple Choice Questions - Best Practices.

Assignment:
Test is Wed/Thu over Unit 1
Unit 1 FRQ is due on Friday Sept 26
Study the notes, YouTube lectures, Target Sheets, and information at this link for Unit 1
Eurasian Empires is the topic of Chapter 4. "Use the force, young ones."
________________________________________
Wednesday, Sept 17 & Thursday, Sept 18, 2014
Quote"Everything we do, every thought we've ever had, is produced by the human brain. But exactly how it operates remains one of the biggest unsolved mysteries, and it seems the more we probe its secrets, the more surprises we find." - Neil deGrasse Tyson

Learning Targets:
★To establish the relationship between the First Civilizations and the Agricultural Revolution
★To contrast civilizations with other forms of human communities
★To explore when, where, and how the First Civilizations arose in human history
★To explore how the emergence of civilizations transformed how humans lived and how their societies were structured
★To show the various ways in which civilizations differed from one another
★To explore the outcomes of the emergence of civilizations, both positive and negative, for humankind

Essential Questions:
1. What distinguished civilizations from other forms of human community?
2. How does the use of the term “civilization” by historians differ from that of popular usage? How do you use the term?
3. “Civilizations were held together largely by force.” Do you agree with this assessment, or were there other mechanisms of integration as well? 
4. In the development of the First Civilizations, what was gained for humankind, and what was lost?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Unit 1 TEST. You will have 1/2 the period for the test. No extra time.
      ----TEST UNIT 1: Chapters 1, 2, 3 of Strayer-----
2. After the test - students will pick up the FRQ Assignment (due next Friday, Sept. 26)
3. Intro to Unit 2 & Chapter 4 - Eurasian Empire. What is Empire?
4. Crash Course World History #4 - Persians & Greeks

Assignment:
Quiz over Chapter 4 is on Monday.
Unit 1 FRQ is due on Friday Sept 26
Study the notes, YouTube lectures, Target Sheets, and information at this link for Unit 1
"Occupy Dock Bay" - The Storm troopers unionize. There goes the empire!
________________________________________
Friday, Sep 19, 2014
Quote: "Science is nothing but perception." - Plato
Learning Targets:
★ Define the characteristics of imperial systems in the classical era and analyze why empires developed in some regions but not in others.
★ Compare the important similarities and differences between imperial systems and the reasons behind them
★ Explain the significance that classical empires have for us today, such as, representative government, military power, etc.
★ Evaluate the “greatness” of the Roman Empire and China’s Han Dynasty and determine if their destructive and oppressive features outweighed their impressive advances.

Essential Questions:
1. What common features can you identify in the empires described in this chapter?
2. In what ways did these empires differ from one another? What accounts for those differences?
3. Are you more impressed with the “greatness” of empires or with their destructive and oppressive features? Why? 
4. Do you think that the classical empires hold “lessons” for the present, or are contemporary circumstances sufficiently unique as to render the distant past irrelevant?

Agenda:
1. DO NOWCompare the Athenian and Persian Empires according to political, social, and economic factors.
2. Notes & Discussion: How to write the Comparative FRQ.
3. Discuss: Direct comparisons. Students will write a direct comparison of Athenian and Persian political or social or economic factors.

Assignment:
Quiz over Chapter 4 is on Monday.
Unit 1 FRQ is due on Friday Sept 26
Study the notes, YouTube lectures, Target Sheets, and information at this link for Unit 1

Agenda: Sept 8 - 12, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 1 - First Things First, to 500 BCE
Ch. 1 First Humans, Ch. 2 First Farmers, Ch. 3 First Civilizations
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON: Reading Check Quiz CH 1 & 2; Andrew Marr's "Survival" (first few min)
TUE: Guns, Germs, & Steel: Episode I "Out of Eden" with questions
WED/THU: Guns, Germs, & Steel: Episode I continued; Discussion; FRQ Project Intro
FRI: FRQ Comparative Essay strategies
Chumash of Southern California
______________________________________________
Monday, Sep 8, 2014
Quote: “People often say that motivation doesn't last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.” - Zig Ziglar

Learning Targets:
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in the gathering and hunting societies

Essential Questions:
1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic era in world history?
2. In what ways did various Paleolithic societies differ from one another, and how did they change over time?
3. What statements in this chapter seem to be reliable and solidly based on facts, and which ones are more speculative and uncertain?
4. How might our attitudes toward the modern world influence our assessment of Paleolithic societies?
5. In what ways, and why, did Chumash culture differ from that of the San?
6. Why did some Paleolithic peoples abandon earlier, more nomadic ways and begin to live a more settled life?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Reading Check Quiz. You may use any hand written notes. NOTHING PRINTED.
2. Reading Check Quiz - Chapter 1 & Chapter 2
3. Review quiz answers in class.
4. Andrew Marr's "History of the World" Episode 1 "Survival"
(we'll see the first 10 minutes or so and discuss, relating to Strayer)

Assignment:
Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Use the Target Sheet. Learn the definitions.
Watch the video notes Mr. Duez has posted.
Unit 1 Test is next Wed/Thu
______________________________________________
Tuesday, Sep 9, 2014
Quote: "If you want to achieve excellence, you can get there today. As of this second, quit doing less-than-excellent work." - Thomas J. Watson
GGAS - Much better than having
to read the book!

Learning Targets:
To make students aware that agriculture evolved independently in several regions of the world
To trace the development of agriculture and its local variations
To consider the social implications of the Agricultural Revolution

Essential Questions:
1. The Agricultural Revolution marked a decisive turning point in human history. What evidence might you offer to support this claim, and how might you argue against it?
2. How did early agricultural societies differ from those of the Paleolithic era? How does the example of settled gathering and hunting peoples such as the Chumash complicate this comparison?
3. Was the Agricultural Revolution inevitable? Why did it occur so late in the story of humankind?
4. “The Agricultural Revolution provides evidence for ‘progress’ in human affairs.” How would you evaluate this statement?
5. What accounts for the emergence of agriculture after countless millennia of human life without it?
6. What different kinds of societies emerged out of the Agricultural Revolution?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Viewing Guide: Copy the questions on the overhead for Guns, Germs, and Steel.
2. Video Study: Guns, Germs, and Steel, episode 1: "Out of Eden." Students will watch the video and take notes. Students should also answer the questions from the DO NOW in their notes. We will discuss the video throughout.

Assignment:
Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Use the Target Sheet. Learn the definitions.
Watch the video notes Mr. Duez has posted.
Unit 1 Test is next Wed/Thu
"How come white man have so much cargo, yet can't shoot a bow?" - might not be a direct quote :)
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Wednesday, Sep 10 & Thursday, Sep 11, 2014
Quote: "Adversity is the state in which man mostly easily becomes acquainted with himself, being especially free of admirers then." - John Wooden

Learning Targets:
Understand the need for art in the human condition and its purpose in facilitating imagination, knowledge, and understanding.

Essential Questions:
1. Why did paleolithic peoples create cave rock art?
2. What is it about the human condition that makes us want to connect with previous and future generations?
3. What is history?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up Diamond article from front table: The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race - first 15 min to read & annotate
2. Finish Video StudyGuns, Germs, and Steel, episode 1: "Out of Eden." Students will watch the video and take notes. Students should also answer the questions from the DO NOW in their notes. We will discuss the video throughout.
3. Discuss documentary & finish read/annotate Diamond.
4. Discuss What Accounts for the initial breakthrough into civilization?

Assignment:
Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Use the Target Sheet. Learn the definitions.
Watch the video notes Mr. Duez has posted.
Unit 1 Test is next Wed/Thu
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Friday, Sep 12, 2014
Quote: "Humanity is losing its geniuses. Aristotle died, Newton passed away, Einstein died, and I'm not feeling well today... "

Learning Targets:
1. Understand that the Comparative Essay is one of three FRQ questions on the AP Exam.
2. A direct comparison means that you will connect both topics that you are comparing in each paragraph.
3. You must describe both similarities & differences; as well as analyze WHY many of them exist.
4. The thesis statement is the key to the entire essay. It is the answer to the prompt. Without a thesis statement, your essay will not be given a score.
5. There are literally no wrong thesis statements. You either prove them with your evidence, or you have fallen short of the mark and have been unconvincing.

Essential Questions:
1. Why do we write in history?
2. How do historians write?
3. What do I do if the prompt seems completely VAGUE?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Pick up the AP Acronyms Handout & FRQ Essay Assignment - due Next Friday in class completed.
2. Review the 6 Glasses essays. Discuss best practices, show examples of great work. Emphasis on Thesis and the "Comparative Essay."
3. Cover the key points to the WHAP-COMPARISON-ESSAY-INTRO-THESIS notes on writing.

Assignment:
Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3. Use the Target Sheet. Learn the definitions.
Quiz over CH 3 on Monday
Watch the video notes Mr. Duez has posted.
Unit 1 Test is next Wed/Thu
FRQ is due next Friday. It is a take home essay.

Agenda: Week of Sept 2 - Sept 5, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Summer Reading Unit - Standage - Six Glasses
and
Strayer Unit 1: First Humans, Chapters 1, 2, & 3
Week at a Glance:
MON - LABOR DAY - No School. YES!
TUE - 6 Glasses epilogue; review for the test
WED/THU - TEST: 6 Glasses; Pick up article - "First Americans"
FRI - 1st Americans article due; Socratic Discussion; Crash Course WH #1 Ag Revolution
-------
MON next week - Quiz Chapter 1 & 2.
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Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Quote: "I am a great believer in luck. I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it." - Thomas Jefferson
What does Labor Day celebrate? (it's not barbecue or football!) 
Targets:
Examination of the major themes of WHAP:
The course covers these 6 themes:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment
Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures
Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

1. How was beer "essential" to human civilization?
2. How did the use of wine in Roman culture differ from that of ancient Greece?
3. Why do Christians Drink Wine and Muslims Do Not?
4. How did Columbian Exchange change the globe?
5. What is colonization and how to British imperial power change the world?
6. How does 'coca-colonization' explain American dominance in the 20th century?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW - Pick up the 6 Glasses Epilogue from the front desk. Annotate. (10 min)
2. Discuss the epilogue: Do you agree with Standage that the most important drink of the present and future is WATER?
3. SPICE CHART: Students will get a SPICE chart. They should use this for each of the six drinks, but especially to compare 2 of them. This will help them study for the test and also prepare for any kind of essay prompt.
3. Quick informative quiz - what words should be associated with each of the six drinks Standage refers to in his book? (Example, Age of Reasoning = Coffee)
Mark Phillips speaks with Tom Standage, the author of "A History of the World in 6 Glasses," about the influence of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea and cola from the stone-age until the present.

Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
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Wednesday, Sept 3, 2014 & Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014
Quote: "Unless you pay the price for success, you will not know it's worth." - Apoorve Dubey

Part 1 - First Things First Beginnings in History, to 500 BCE
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in the gathering and hunting societies 

How do we know our past, before writing?
Essential Questions:
1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic era in world history?
2. In what ways did various Paleolithic societies differ from one another, and how did they change over time?
3. What statements in this chapter seem to be reliable and solidly based on facts, and which ones are more speculative and uncertain?
4. How might our attitudes toward the modern world influence our assessment of Paleolithic societies?

Agenda:
1. TEST - Summer Reading - A History of the World in Six Glasses
2. Read Article: First Humans "Finding the First Humans: When and how did the first humans arrive in the Americas?" 
3. Video: The Incredible Human Journey: Part I by Dr. Alice Roberts
In the first episode of the Incredible Human Journey, Roberts introduces the idea that genetic analysis suggests that all modern humans are descended from Africans. She visits the site of the Omo remains in Ethiopia, which are the earliest known anatomically modern humans. She visits the San people of Namibia to demonstrate the hunter-gatherer lifestyle. In South Africa, she visits Pinnacle Point, to see the cave in which very early humans lived. She then explains that genetics suggests that all non-Africans may descend from a single, small group of Africans who left the continent tens of thousands of years ago. She explores various theories as to the route they took. She describes the Jebel Qafzeh remains in Israel as a likely dead end from a crossing of Suez, and sees a route across the Red Sea and around the Arabian coast as the more probable route for modern human ancestors, especially given the lower sea levels of the past

Assignment: 
Review the notes from Unit 1, either by presentation or Mr. Duez's video. Read Strayer Chapters 1 and 2. Use the Target Sheet for Unit 1. Know your vocabulary for the quiz - along with hand written notes.
Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
Quiz over Chapter 1 and 2 on Monday.
Dr. Alice Roberts: her incredibly inquisitive nature leads her to Africa to discover the beginning of our Human Journey.
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Friday, Sept. 6, 2013
Quote: “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there." - Will Rogers

Part 1 - First Things First Beginnings in History, to 500 BCE
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in the gathering and hunting societies 

1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic era in world history?
2. In what ways did various Paleolithic societies differ from one another, and how did they change over time?
3. What statements in this chapter seem to be reliable and solidly based on facts, and which ones are more speculative and uncertain?
4. How might our attitudes toward the modern world influence our assessment of Paleolithic societies?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW - In what ways, and why, did the Chumash culture differ from that of the San? (Strayer p. 29)
2. Socratic Text Based DiscussionFirst Humans "Finding the First Humans: When and how did the first humans arrive in the Americas?" 
3. Crash Course WH Video: If time remains, watch & discuss: Crash Course World History #1 - Agricultural Revolution
Assignment: 
Review the notes from Unit 1, either by presentation or Mr. Duez's video. Read Strayer Chapters 1 and 2. Use the Target Sheet for Unit 1. Know your vocabulary for the quiz - along with hand written notes.
Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
Quiz over Chapter 1 and 2 on Monday.