Agenda: Week of Sept 2 - Sept 5, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Summer Reading Unit - Standage - Six Glasses
and
Strayer Unit 1: First Humans, Chapters 1, 2, & 3
Week at a Glance:
MON - LABOR DAY - No School. YES!
TUE - 6 Glasses epilogue; review for the test
WED/THU - TEST: 6 Glasses; Pick up article - "First Americans"
FRI - 1st Americans article due; Socratic Discussion; Crash Course WH #1 Ag Revolution
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MON next week - Quiz Chapter 1 & 2.
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Tuesday, September 2, 2014
Quote: "I am a great believer in luck. I find that the harder I work, the more I have of it." - Thomas Jefferson
What does Labor Day celebrate? (it's not barbecue or football!) 
Targets:
Examination of the major themes of WHAP:
The course covers these 6 themes:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment
Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures
Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

1. How was beer "essential" to human civilization?
2. How did the use of wine in Roman culture differ from that of ancient Greece?
3. Why do Christians Drink Wine and Muslims Do Not?
4. How did Columbian Exchange change the globe?
5. What is colonization and how to British imperial power change the world?
6. How does 'coca-colonization' explain American dominance in the 20th century?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW - Pick up the 6 Glasses Epilogue from the front desk. Annotate. (10 min)
2. Discuss the epilogue: Do you agree with Standage that the most important drink of the present and future is WATER?
3. SPICE CHART: Students will get a SPICE chart. They should use this for each of the six drinks, but especially to compare 2 of them. This will help them study for the test and also prepare for any kind of essay prompt.
3. Quick informative quiz - what words should be associated with each of the six drinks Standage refers to in his book? (Example, Age of Reasoning = Coffee)
Mark Phillips speaks with Tom Standage, the author of "A History of the World in 6 Glasses," about the influence of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea and cola from the stone-age until the present.

Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
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Wednesday, Sept 3, 2014 & Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014
Quote: "Unless you pay the price for success, you will not know it's worth." - Apoorve Dubey

Part 1 - First Things First Beginnings in History, to 500 BCE
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in the gathering and hunting societies 

How do we know our past, before writing?
Essential Questions:
1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic era in world history?
2. In what ways did various Paleolithic societies differ from one another, and how did they change over time?
3. What statements in this chapter seem to be reliable and solidly based on facts, and which ones are more speculative and uncertain?
4. How might our attitudes toward the modern world influence our assessment of Paleolithic societies?

Agenda:
1. TEST - Summer Reading - A History of the World in Six Glasses
2. Read Article: First Humans "Finding the First Humans: When and how did the first humans arrive in the Americas?" 
3. Video: The Incredible Human Journey: Part I by Dr. Alice Roberts
In the first episode of the Incredible Human Journey, Roberts introduces the idea that genetic analysis suggests that all modern humans are descended from Africans. She visits the site of the Omo remains in Ethiopia, which are the earliest known anatomically modern humans. She visits the San people of Namibia to demonstrate the hunter-gatherer lifestyle. In South Africa, she visits Pinnacle Point, to see the cave in which very early humans lived. She then explains that genetics suggests that all non-Africans may descend from a single, small group of Africans who left the continent tens of thousands of years ago. She explores various theories as to the route they took. She describes the Jebel Qafzeh remains in Israel as a likely dead end from a crossing of Suez, and sees a route across the Red Sea and around the Arabian coast as the more probable route for modern human ancestors, especially given the lower sea levels of the past

Assignment: 
Review the notes from Unit 1, either by presentation or Mr. Duez's video. Read Strayer Chapters 1 and 2. Use the Target Sheet for Unit 1. Know your vocabulary for the quiz - along with hand written notes.
Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
Quiz over Chapter 1 and 2 on Monday.
Dr. Alice Roberts: her incredibly inquisitive nature leads her to Africa to discover the beginning of our Human Journey.
__________________________________________
Friday, Sept. 6, 2013
Quote: “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there." - Will Rogers

Part 1 - First Things First Beginnings in History, to 500 BCE
To familiarize students with the spread of human societies in the Paleolithic era
To explore the conditions of life in gathering and hunting societies
To examine factors that eventually led to change in the gathering and hunting societies 

1. What is the significance of the Paleolithic era in world history?
2. In what ways did various Paleolithic societies differ from one another, and how did they change over time?
3. What statements in this chapter seem to be reliable and solidly based on facts, and which ones are more speculative and uncertain?
4. How might our attitudes toward the modern world influence our assessment of Paleolithic societies?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW - In what ways, and why, did the Chumash culture differ from that of the San? (Strayer p. 29)
2. Socratic Text Based DiscussionFirst Humans "Finding the First Humans: When and how did the first humans arrive in the Americas?" 
3. Crash Course WH Video: If time remains, watch & discuss: Crash Course World History #1 - Agricultural Revolution
Assignment: 
Review the notes from Unit 1, either by presentation or Mr. Duez's video. Read Strayer Chapters 1 and 2. Use the Target Sheet for Unit 1. Know your vocabulary for the quiz - along with hand written notes.
Bring your notes, 3 ring binder, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day. 
Quiz over Chapter 1 and 2 on Monday.

AHS Tour of Mr. Duez's Room

Trying something new this year.
Thought this might be nice for parents. Or for students to show someone what our room looks like. :)
The view out of our back window in 1207.
The view just inside the door in the front of the classroom looking towards the assignment board.
See a slideshow of images, including the 360 degree shots from below at this link:
Mr. Duez's Classroom Slideshow Tour Extravaganza 2014

View of Mr. Duez's room from the podium at the front:



View more 360 viewpoints below:

Agenda: Week of August 25 - August 29, 2014

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Summer Reading Unit - Standage - Six Glasses
Week at a Glance:
MON - Welcome, Introductions, History Pre-Quiz.
TUE - How to use the website, what is a flipped class?, 6 Glasses Discussion
WED/THU - How to WHAP - through 6 Glasses: Periodization, Themes, & Historical Thinking with 6 Glasses
FRI - Quiz over Standage. Review the quiz results. How to prepare for the test next Wed/Thu over the summer reading - 6 Glasses.
Thinking of the awesome class of 2014 this week. Hoping they are well where ever life takes them!
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Monday, August 25, 2014
Quote: "Begin with the end in mind."

Unit: Introduction to Course: Summer Reading Discussion - A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage

Targets:
1. Clearly understand the scope and procedures of WHAP.
2. Examine the major themes of the WHAP course.
3. Understand expectations regarding summer reading text.
4. WHAP Skills: Periodization, Themes, Historical Thinking Skills. Understand them and apply them to the summer reading Six Glasses.

Essential Questions:
1. What is World History?
2. What is Advanced Placement?
3. Why Standage and Six Glasses?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW - Pick up a welcome letter on the table.
Read, mark, and write down any questions you have as Mr. Duez takes attendance.
2. Welcome to World History ADVANCED PLACEMENT
Discuss the summer reading, syllabus, course objectives.
3. History Pre-Quiz. A quick 20 minute quiz that will check for any knowledge of history students may already have coming into the class. Students will do it on their own. If time permits they will share and compare answers with a partner and then a full class discussion.

Assignment:
Fill out the student survey. Due on Tuesday of next week.
Watch the screencasts over Six Glasses, take notes.
Bring your notebook, pens/pencils, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day.
Bring questions you have over anything and ask them at any time.
Six Glasses: Quiz is on Friday. Test is next Wed/Thu.
Does Standage match each period with a drink, roughly? 
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Tuesday, August 26, 2014
Quote: "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." - Laozi

Unit: Introduction to Course And Summer Reading Discussion - A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage

Targets:
Examination of the major themes of WHAP:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment
Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures
Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict (Political)
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures
Mr. Duez created this "SPICE" rack this summer. NICE!
Essential Questions:
1. Which two of the six glasses that Standage refers to are the most similar? How & Why?
2. Which 2 are the most different? How & Why?
3. Can you group them in twos? How & Why?
4. Also discuss periodization through the summer reading:
5. Can you explain the major events from each period that can be tied back to each drink?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Which 2 six glasses that Standage refers to are the most similar? Explain How & Why? (Think in terms of WHAP Themes: S.P.I.C.E.)
2. Video Clip: How to Use The Website, by Aidan Duez. (5 min) Discuss any questions after the video ends. Pull up the website, walk through how to find the resources needed to study and prepare for the Six Glasses quiz on Friday & test next Wed/Thu.
3. Six Glasses Comparison: Students will discuss six glasses in terms of grouping the drinks. Which have similar characteristics? Which drinks contributed to world history in similar ways?

Assignment:
Fill out the student survey. Due on Tuesday of next week.
Watch the screencasts over Six Glasses, take notes.
Bring your notebook, pens/pencils, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day.
Bring questions you have over anything and ask them at any time.
Six Glasses: Quiz is on Friday. Test is next Wed/Thu.
The beach and Six Glasses... two great things that work great together! That's why it's summer reading folks!
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Wed. & Thu. August 27 & 28, 2014
Quote: “Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

Unit: Introduction to Course And Summer Reading Discussion - A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage

Targets:
Examination of the major themes of WHAP:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment
Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures
Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict (Political)
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

Essential Questions:
1. How was beer "essential" to human civilization?
2. How did the use of wine in Roman culture differ from that of ancient Greece?
3. Why do Christians Drink Wine and Muslims Do Not?
4. How did Columbian Exchange change the globe?
5. What is colonization and how to British imperial power change the world?
6. How does 'coca-colonization' explain American dominance in the 20th century?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Students will pick up the Introduction to Six Glasses. They will annotate the text by following directions at the top. 
2. Periodization through Six Glasses:
I. Individual students will copy down the periods of world history written on the board. Using their notes from the summer reading, they will pencil in each of the six glasses to where they correspond.
II. Individual students will write the important historical events that occur during those time periods.
III. Working in pairs, students will put their heads together to fill in anything they may be missing. We will also write each drink next to each period on the board. Then write the corresponding important events that may have occurred in those time periods. Students have a better understanding of how Standage's Six Glasses connect with world history.

Discuss these questions in pairs and then as a full class:
A. What was the impact of beer and wine on world history? 
B. Explain what a spirit drink is and what is the significance of this drink on world history?
C. How is coffee a "revolutionary" drink?
D. How is Tea and Coca-Cola similar
E. Students will discuss the impact of trade on the globalization of the planet.

3. Video Clip: The History of the World in 7 Minutes. Students will watch the video clip.
A. Then they will discuss their reaction in pairs. 
B. How did the video make you feel, did your feelings change during the video? Why?
C. What is the creator of the video attempting to show? 
D. How does this video portray his "Point of View"?
E. Can you explain the first drink that Standage refers to in context with the video clip?

Assignment:
Fill out the student survey. Due on Tuesday of next week.
Watch the screencasts over Six Glasses, take notes.
Bring your notebook, pens/pencils, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day.
Bring questions you have over anything and ask them at any time.
Six Glasses: Quiz is on Friday. Test is next Wed/Thu.
History is many things to many people. To me, it is pretty awesome.
______________________________
Friday, Aug. 29, 2014 -- shortened periods due to extended Advisory for AHS Pep Rally
Quote: “If opportunity doesn't knock, build a door.” - Milton Berle

Unit: Introduction to Course And Summer Reading Discussion - A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage

Targets:
Examination of the major themes of WHAP:
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment
Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures
Theme 3: State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict (Political)
Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems
Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures

Essential Questions:
1. How was beer "essential" to human civilization?
2. How did the use of wine in Roman culture differ from that of ancient Greece?
3. Why do Christians Drink Wine and Muslims Do Not?
4. How did Columbian Exchange change the globe?
5. What is colonization and how to British imperial power change the world?
6. How does 'coca-colonization' explain American dominance in the 20th century?

Agenda:
1. Quiz over Six Glasses.
2. Review the quiz and answers.
3. How to succeed & survive in WHAP. Advice from students of the past in video form. :)
How will I survive WHAP? - A Google Search - Video YouTube
How to survive AP World History - a student perspective - Video YouTube

Assignment:
Fill out the student survey. Due on Tuesday of next week.
Watch the screencasts over Six Glasses, take notes.
Bring your notebook, pens/pencils, and your brain to class. We will use them in class each day.
Bring questions you have over anything and ask them at any time.
Six Glasses: Quiz is on Friday. Test is next Wed/Thu.

Textbooks

If you still have not gotten a textbook...  
The textbook room will be open every day after school for the first week for those students that did not attend Flight School.  We will open at 2:50 and close at 3:15.

If a student has early release then they must see Gold 2 Secretary or Principal before school to fill out a textbook request form and we will have them pick them up the next morning.

Any student that has any lost textbook(s) from the previous year will not be allowed to check out textbooks until the books have been paid for.
Of course you could always purchase a book if you wished. 

I had several students do that last year.


Textbook: Strayer, Robert W. Ways of the World: A Global History with Sources. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s 2011, 1st Edition.

Funny Email

Got this email tonight from a former WHAP and future AP Psych student:
"I saw you the other day on television! I didn't think I would see you again until school started back up again!
Many people wanted me to share this with you, so I hope you get a good laugh or two! Have a great day/night!
Sincerely,
B~"
Pretty funny. The pic on the right is what they sent me, but I figured it looked more like Colonel Sanders & Donald Sutherland combined. But, come to think of it, I love both of those guys.

So, be it. "Let the Southern Fried Chicken Games Begin!"

2014 Summer Reading for AP World History

Click this link to see: Six Glasses Information, Reading Check Questions, Notes over the book, and Video Lectures by Mr. Duez over the entire book

Welcome to WHAP young Jedi. This is a monumental undertaking that you are about to embark on with, what for many of you is, your first REAL Advanced Placement class. As you have already been forewarned, this is a class that will challenge you to the highest level. Do not let the challenge deter you. You can do it. But it takes hard work.
Believe it or not, that's actually 6 Glasses being read at the beach. I kid you not.
Personally I have just finished the best year of teaching in my career. The students who have blazed a trail before you the previous three years have helped me to create a class where I am certain these things WILL happen:
1. You will learn how to work at a college level.
2. You will write more in this class than any class you have ever had before.
3. You will become skilled in the art and science of analytically thinking through difficult questions and superbly stating your answer when writing a thesis to argue a historical point.
4. You WILL be prepared for the AP World History Test on May 15, 2014. (A mere 341 days, as I write this)
5. You will learn things about the world, history, culture, conflict, and the human condition that you did not know before.
6. You will have fun doing it, but the struggle will not be easy.
The best way to prepare yourself is to get the summer read: "A History of the World in Six Glasses" by Tom Standage and have it read and understood by the first day of school. We will spend the first 10 days discussing the book, learning how Advanced Placement functions, and introducing you to the fast-paced and incredible world of AP World History.

The first quiz is the first Friday.

The first test is the first block day (the following Wed/Thu).

These tests and quizzes are not meant to crush you, wean the weak out of this class, or punish those who could not understand the summer reading on their own. The quiz and test are exactly like the ones we will take while studying "The Ways of the World" by Robert W. Strayer during the school year. They are meant to support the outside of class work you will do (and that is a lot!) and prepare you for a very rigorous AP Test in May.

As I mentioned earlier, you will be ready.

The summer reading takes you through the entire course of history that we are preparing to study. It is a wonderful way to prep for the year. Good luck and please feel free to email me if you have any questions: david.duez@gmail.com

Even though it is summer, I don't mind answering emails. I would rather do so now than have confused and intimidated students on the first day of class.

AP Psych Summer Read: 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology

Please see this link for all the information on the summer read for AP Psychology.
Psychology is NOT all common sense. It is the scientific study of the mind and behavior.
Looking forward to seeing so many of you again next year (or your senior year)! I am a lucky man to have the chance to continue teaching such wonderful students. Thanks again for a great year!

Also, there are new Crash Course Psychology videos being released each Monday this summer! :) Trade in John Green for his brother Hank. (DFTBA!)

7th Period: Thanks for a Great Year!


6th Period: Thanks for a Great Year!


5th Period WHAP: Thanks for a great year!