Agenda: Feb 2 - Feb 6, 2015

World History AP with Mr. Duez
Unit 5: THE EUROPEAN MOMENT IN WORLD HISTORY, 1750-1914
Chapter 17 Atlantic Revolutions & their Echoes
Chapter 18 Revolutions of Industry
Week at a Glance:
MON: Quiz Ch 17; French Revolution Compared to other Atlantic Revolutions
TUE: ; French Revolution Documentary w/Questions
WED/THU: French Revolution Documentary w/Questions; The Art of the French Revolution
FRI: CCOT: Discuss good/bad with previous essay; look at good examples of work (Thesis, WHC); Intro to the Industrial Revolution - Chapter 18
As it still does today, art inspired people of the Atlantic Revolutions, David's Oath of the Horatii - cartoon version.
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Chapter 17 - Atlantic Revolutions - TARGETS
Link to History Channel's Documentary The French Revolution, Part I: Intro to Fall of Bastille

Link to Questions to answer for French Revolution Documentary 

Crash Course World History - Revolutions:
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Monday, February 2, 2015
Quote of the Day: "One must maintain a little bit of summer, in the the midst of winter." H. D. Thoreau

Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality.
* How much violence is necessary or justifiable?

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the ideas of the Enlightenment contribute to the Atlantic revolutions?
2. What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
3. How did the French Revolution differ from the American Revolution?
4. Compare the Atlantic Revolutions.

Agenda:
1. Quiz CH 17 - Reading Check. Students may use hand written notes on the quiz.
2. Review CH 17 Quiz ~ Atlantic Revolutions
3. Notes, Discussion: Atlantic Revolutions Compared

Assignments:
We are watching the French Revolution Documentary and answering the questions in class. 
Read Chapters 17 & 18. Be able to compare the Atlantic Revolutions. 
Begin working on Industrial Revolution, Chapter 18 - so that you are prepared for the quiz on Ch 18. TEST over 17 & 18 is on Wednesday/Thursday Feb. 11th and 12th.
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Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015
Quote of the Day:  "A snow day literally and figuratively falls -unbidden - and seems like a thing of wonder." Susan Orlean

Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality.
* How much violence is necessary or justifiable?

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the ideas of the Enlightenment contribute to the Atlantic revolutions?
2. What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
3. How did the French Revolution differ from the American Revolution?
4. Compare the Atlantic Revolutions.

Agenda:
1. French Revolution Documentary - answer the questions as we view and we will pause and discuss throughout.
2. Discuss the answers to the question and the video. What are the reasons for revolution in France

Assignments:
We are watching the French Revolution Documentary and answering the questions in class. 
Read Chapters 17 & 18. Be able to compare the Atlantic Revolutions. 
Begin working on Industrial Revolution, Chapter 18 - so that you are prepared for the quiz on Ch 18TEST over 17 & 18 is on Wednesday/Thursday Feb. 11th and 12th.
The Tennis Court Oath, by David
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Wednesday, Feb. 4th, 2015 & Thursday, Feb. 5, 2015
Quote of the Day:  "Nothing burns like the cold." - Anon.

Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality.
* How much violence is necessary or justifiable?

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the ideas of the Enlightenment contribute to the Atlantic revolutions?
2. What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
3. How did the French Revolution differ from the American Revolution?
4. Compare the Atlantic Revolutions.

Agenda:
1. French Revolution Documentary - answer the questions as we view and we will pause and discuss throughout.
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: The Art of the French Revolution.

Assignments:
We are watching the French Revolution Documentary and answering the questions in class. 
Read Chapters 17 & 18. Be able to compare the Atlantic Revolutions. 
Begin working on Industrial Revolution, Chapter 18 - so that you are prepared for the quiz on Ch 18TEST over 17 & 18 is on Wednesday/Thursday Feb. 11th and 12th.
The Death of Marat, by David
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Friday, Feb. 6, 2015
Quote of the Day: "One kind word can warm 3 winter months." - Japanese Proverb


Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality.
* How much violence is necessary or justifiable?

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the ideas of the Enlightenment contribute to the Atlantic revolutions?
2. What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
3. How did the French Revolution differ from the American Revolution?
4. Compare the Atlantic Revolutions.

Agenda:
1. Discuss the CCOT Timed Writing from last month. 
2. Discuss Chapter 17 - Atlantic Revolutions Compared.
3. Introduction to Chapter 18 - Revolutions of Industry

Assignments:
We are watching the French Revolution Documentary and answering the questions in class. 
Read Chapters 17 & 18. Be able to compare the Atlantic Revolutions. 
Begin working on Industrial Revolution, Chapter 18 - so that you are prepared for the quiz on Ch 18TEST over 17 & 18 is on Wednesday/Thursday Feb. 11th and 12th.

Humble ISD: Named to AP College Board's 5th Annual AP District Honor Roll

This is something that my wife and I are quite proud of and certainly others in our district will be as well when they hear the news. Mrs. Duez and I have both been involved with the AP program here in Humble ISD since 2002. (Which also means I'm getting old, which might explain my excessive crankiness at times.) 

I had not seen this news story until Mrs. Duez pointed it out today. 

This is quite impressive when you consider that there are 1031 public school districts in Texas, 1,297 private schools, and 618 charter schools in the state.

Bottom line is the parents and students of our community should really be celebrating this recommendation as: AP District Honor Roll. They are the ones who have agreed to take on the very challenging, but worthwhile effort to compete at the highest levels of academics. They have shelled out the money for the tests, dealt with seemingly insane teachers who expect a great deal from them, and put it all on the line on test day. 

Outstanding.


Yep, there it is. Star is for "Multiple Years" 
*= 30 %+ enrollment of American Indian, African American, & Hispanic/Latino students

The Humble Independent School District was recently named to College Board’s fifth Annual AP District Honor Roll.
Posted: Thursday, January 22, 2015 7:00 pm

The Honor Roll recognizes 547 school districts in the U.S. and Canada that have increased access to AP course work while maintaining or increasing the percentage of students earning scores of three or higher on AP Exams.

Humble ISD is one of only 29 school districts in the state of Texas to make the honor roll. District’s chosen for the Annual AP District Honor Roll data show that they are successfully identifying motivated, academically prepared students who are likely to benefit from rigorous AP course work.

The Advanced Placement program allows high school students to take college-level courses and exams that may result in earning college credit. Individual colleges and universities determine course credit, with scores of three to five being widely acknowledged by universities. AP courses are taught at the high school campus or online by high school teachers who have completed AP training.

“I am especially proud to share this good news because I have seen firsthand the value that AP courses add to students’ lives,” said Humble ISD Superintendent Dr. Guy Sconzo.

Each year the number of students enrolled in AP courses are increasing and creating more opportunities for students in Humble ISD to ensure college and career readiness.

AP is just one of several opportunities in Humble ISD for student’s to earn college credit while in high school. Humble ISD also offers International Baccalaureate, Dual Credit and Early College High School. The hard work, commitment and dedication of teachers and students make this success possible.

From the College Board (here):

Data from 2014 show that among African American, Hispanic, and Native American students with a high degree of readiness for AP, only about half of students are participating because their schools do not always offer the AP course for which they have potential. These 547 districts are committed to expanding the availability of AP courses among prepared and motivated students of all backgrounds.

Helping more students learn at a higher level and earn higher AP scores is an objective of all members of the AP community, from AP teachers to district and school administrators to college professors. Many districts are experimenting with a variety of initiatives and strategies to determine how to simultaneously expand access and improve student performance.

Inclusion on the 5th Annual AP District Honor Roll is based on the examination of three years of AP data, from 2012 to 2014, for the following criteria.
  • Increased participation/access to AP by at least 4 percent in large districts, at least 6 percent in medium districts, and at least 11 percent in small districts;
  • Increased or maintained the percentage of exams taken by African American, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian/Alaska Native students, and;
  • Improved performance levels when comparing the percentage of students in 2014 scoring a 3 or higher to those in 2012, unless the district has already attained a performance level at which more than 70 percent of its AP students are scoring a 3 or higher.

Agenda: Week of Jan. 26-30, 2015

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 4 - Early Modern World, 1450-1750
Chapter 14 - Empires & Encounters
Chapter 15 - World Commerce
Chapter 16 - Science and Religion
Week at a Glance:
MON- Quiz CH 16; Review Quiz
TUE- Counselors for scheduling 2015-16 school year; Silver Trade
WED/THU- TEST Unit 4; Intro to Unit 5 "European Moment" 1750-1914
FRI- The Atlantic Revolutions; American & French; French Revolution Documentary

TEST Unit 4 (CH 14, 15, 16): Wed/Thu
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Monday, January 26, 2015

Quote: 
Learning Targets:
1. Explore the early modern roots of modern tension between religion and science
2. Examine the Reformation movements in Europe and their significance
3. Investigate the global spread of Christianity and the extent to which it syncretized with native traditions
4. Expand the discussion of religious change to include religious movements in China, India, and the Islamic world
5. Explore the reasons behind the Scientific Revolution in Europe, and why that movement was limited in other parts of the world
6. Explore the implications of the Scientific Revolution for world societies

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the Protestant Reformation transform European society, culture, and politics? 
2. How was European imperial expansion related to the spread of Christianity?
3. In what ways was European Christianity assimilated into the Native American cultures of Spanish America?
4. Why were missionary efforts to spread Christianity so much less successful in China than in Spanish America?
5. What accounts for the continued spread of Islam in the early modern era and for the emergence of reform or renewal movements within the Islamic world?
6. In what ways did Asian cultural changes in the early modern era parallel those of Europe, and in what ways were they different?
7. Why did the Scientific Revolution occur in Europe rather than in China or the Islamic world?
8. What was revolutionary about the Scientific Revolution?
9. In what ways did the Enlightenment challenge older patterns of European thinking?
10. How did nineteenth-century developments in the sciences challenge the faith of the Enlightenment?
11. In what ways was European science received in the major civilizations of Asia in the early modern era?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW: Prep for Quiz Ch. 16 (students may use hand-written notes)
2. QUIZ Ch 16
DO NOW Question for after quiz: In what ways did the Protestant Reformation transform European society, culture, and politics? 
3. Review Quiz & focus on the question above

Assignments:
TEST Wed/Thu Unit 4
Review Notes for Ch. 14, 15, 16
Use the Online Companion for Strayer
Quizlet is always a great help.
Quizlet: Strayer Unit 4 Vocab
Quizlet: Strayer Unit 4 Questions
Remember the 2006 DBQ Silver Trade - a few questions will focus on point of view and other areas of the DBQ. (Annotated Rubric for help)
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Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Quote:
Learning Targets:
1. Explore the early modern roots of modern tension between religion and science
2. Examine the Reformation movements in Europe and their significance
3. Investigate the global spread of Christianity and the extent to which it syncretized with native traditions
4. Expand the discussion of religious change to include religious movements in China, India, and the Islamic world
5. Explore the reasons behind the Scientific Revolution in Europe, and why that movement was limited in other parts of the world
6. Explore the implications of the Scientific Revolution for world societies

Essential Questions:
1. In what ways did the Protestant Reformation transform European society, culture, and politics? 
2. How was European imperial expansion related to the spread of Christianity?
3. In what ways was European Christianity assimilated into the Native American cultures of Spanish America?
4. Why were missionary efforts to spread Christianity so much less successful in China than in Spanish America?
5. What accounts for the continued spread of Islam in the early modern era and for the emergence of reform or renewal movements within the Islamic world?
6. In what ways did Asian cultural changes in the early modern era parallel those of Europe, and in what ways were they different?
7. Why did the Scientific Revolution occur in Europe rather than in China or the Islamic world?
8. What was revolutionary about the Scientific Revolution?
9. In what ways did the Enlightenment challenge older patterns of European thinking?
10. How did nineteenth-century developments in the sciences challenge the faith of the Enlightenment?
11. In what ways was European science received in the major civilizations of Asia in the early modern era?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTIONIn what ways did the Protestant Reformation transform European society, culture, and politics? 
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: Protestant Reformation, Scientific Revolution, & The Enlightenment.

Assignments:
TEST Wed/Thu Unit 4
Review Notes for Ch. 14, 15, 16
Use the Online Companion for Strayer
Quizlet is always a great help.
Quizlet: Strayer Unit 4 Vocab
Quizlet: Strayer Unit 4 Questions
Remember the 2006 DBQ Silver Trade - a few questions will focus on point of view and other areas of the DBQ. (Annotated Rubric for help)
With transportation of new world & Asian riches, piracy emerges in the Early Modern Era.
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Wednesday, January 28, 2015 & Thursday, January 29, 2015

Quote: 
Agenda:
1. TEST Unit 4 - Chapters 14, 15, 16
2. After test - Introduce Unit 5 - European Moment, 1750-1914
What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?

Assignments:
Read Chapter 17 - prep for quiz on Monday
Atlantic Revolutions & Their Echoes - American, French, Haitian, & Latin American Revolutions
"Mr. Duez, is that real blood, or like, Ketchup or something?"
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Friday, January 30, 2015

Quote: 
Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era. 
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality.
**How much violence is necessary or justifiable?

Essential Questions:
1. Make a chart comparing the North American, French, Haitian, and Spanish American revolutions. What categories of comparison would be most appropriate to include?
2. Do revolutions originate in oppression and injustice, in the weakening of political authorities, in new ideas, or in the activities of small groups of determined activists?
3. “The influence of revolutions endured long after they ended.” To what extent does this chapter support or undermine this idea?
4. In what ways did the Atlantic revolutions and their echoes give a new and distinctive shape to the emerging societies of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas?
Also,
1. In what ways did the ideas of the Enlightenment contribute to the Atlantic revolutions?
2. What was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
3. How did the French Revolution differ from the American Revolution?
4. What was distinctive about the Haitian Revolution, both in world history generally and in the history of Atlantic revolutions? 
5. How were the Spanish American revolutions shaped by the American, French, and Haitian revolutions that happened earlier?
6. What accounts for the end of Atlantic slavery during the nineteenth century?
7. How did the end of slavery affect the lives of the former slaves?
8. What accounts for the growth of nationalism as a powerful political and personal identity in the nineteenth century?
9. What were the achievements and limitations of nineteenth-century feminism?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QuestionWhat was revolutionary about the American Revolution, and what was not?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: American & French Revolutions
3. Video Documentary: History Channel's French Revolution
We'll watch the first 10-15 minutes.
Quiz on Chapter 17 Monday
Tue-Wed/Thu next week we'll focus on finishing this documentary & discussing Atlantic Revolutions in comparison.

Assignments:
Read Chapter 17 - prep for quiz on Monday
Atlantic Revolutions & Their Echoes - American, French, Haitian, & Latin American Revolutions

Inspiration from former student...

BTW- Mr. Duez used to work in that green building in the middle. Yep, 67th floor!
Every once in a while I will post some things about former students. I received a really encouraging message today from a former student and wanted to share it with you. She was a student of mine during the first WHAP class in 2011-2012. In fact, she was the student of the year in AP World History, first one ever at AHS. Then she took AP Psychology the next spring as a junior. She was accepted with honors to the University of Houston. Here's her message:
Mr. Duez:  
I really love it here. I'm living on-campus which honestly really helps because traffic is horrible in the mornings. I made into the Honors College, so the classes are extra small, and I love that. We can be up to only 16 people max. But that doesn't include lectures, of course. The food is pretty good, but after eating it everyday it's really easy to get tired of it. Professors are strict but they really are amazing, not all of them though, some are really hard to please. Hopefully with all the AP Credit I have I'll be able to graduate in 3 years instead of 4. 
Thank you Mr.Duez, I really enjoyed my time at Atascocita, your class was definitely my favorite, WHAP and AP Psychology.  
How is your family doing (including your beloved dog)? 
Love,
Your Former Student
It was awesome to hear from her. Such a great choice to attend U of H on campus. The commute, as I told her, is like driving in to work each day. It can be difficult. We have tough weather, the rush hour traffic can be very hard. The wear and tear on your car, the gas $, the potential for car accidents... all tough. When you live on campus you are much more connected to the school and all that happens there.

It is also incredible to hear that her college credits will help her graduate early. She was not the most fortunate student I have had. She had to work hard for everything she has earned. I am so proud of her and I know many of you will be following in her footsteps. If not to U of H, certainly to the school of your dreams. I am here to tell you that the hard work makes a difference. Keep it up!

Agenda: Week of Jan. 19-23, 2015

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez
Unit 4 - Early Modern World, 1450-1750
Chapter 14 - Empires & Encounters
Chapter 15 - World Commerce
Chapter 16 - Science and Religion
Week at a Glance:
MON- MLK Day
TUE- Counselors for scheduling 2015-16 school year; Silver Trade
WED/THU- Quiz CH 15; Silver TradeDBQ Practice-2006 Silver Trade; CCOT Review from last week; Intro: Chapter 16 Science & Religion with The Reformation
FRI- Andrew Marr's A History of the World: Plunder & Revolution

TEST Unit 4 (CH 14, 15, 16): Next Week on Wed/Thu
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Washington, DC
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Monday January 19, 2015 No School MLK Day

QUOTE OF THE WEEK: 
As we'll learn, MLK learned a few things from Mr. Gandhi of India. And he also taught us a few new tricks. RIP.
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Tuesday, January 20, 2015
Quote: "I am more afraid of my own heart than of the pope and all his cardinals. I have within me the great pope, Self." - Martin Luther
Indulge me!

Learning Targets CH. 16 - Science & Religion:
- Examine the early modern roots of modern tension between religion and science
- Compare the Reformation movements in Europe and their significance
- Analyze the global spread of Christianity and the extent to which it syncretized with native traditions
- Expand the discussion of religious change to include religious movements in China, India, and the Islamic world
- Understand the reasons behind the Scientific Revolution in Europe, and why that movement was limited in other parts of the world
- Examine the implications of the Scientific Revolution for world societies 

Essential Questions:

1. Why did Christianity take hold in some places more than in others?
2. In what ways was the missionary message of Christianity shaped by the cultures of Asian and American peoples?
3. Compare the processes by which Christianity and Islam became world religions.
4. In what ways did the spread of Christianity, Islam, and modern science give rise to culturally based conflicts?
5. Based on Chapters 13 through 16, how does the history of Islam in the early modern era challenge a Eurocentric understanding of those centuries?

Agenda:
1. Counselors coming in this period to discuss schedules 2015-2016 school year.
2. Discuss Silver Trade, if time permits.
Luther, word! Indulgences, yo!
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Wednesday & Thursday January 21 & 22, 2015
Quote: "I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." - Galileo Galilei
Learning Targets CH. 16 - Science & Religion:
- Examine the early modern roots of modern tension between religion and science
- Compare the Reformation movements in Europe and their significance
- Analyze the global spread of Christianity and the extent to which it syncretized with native traditions
- Expand the discussion of religious change to include religious movements in China, India, and the Islamic world
- Understand the reasons behind the Scientific Revolution in Europe, and why that movement was limited in other parts of the world
- Examine the implications of the Scientific Revolution for world societies 

Essential Questions:

1. Why did Christianity take hold in some places more than in others?
2. In what ways was the missionary message of Christianity shaped by the cultures of Asian and American peoples?
3. Compare the processes by which Christianity and Islam became world religions.
4. In what ways did the spread of Christianity, Islam, and modern science give rise to culturally based conflicts?
5. Based on Chapters 13 through 16, how does the history of Islam in the early modern era challenge a Eurocentric understanding of those centuries?

Agenda:
1. Do Now Question: How does the Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment compare to the Protestant Reformation? What characteristics did they share in common?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: The Reformation
- Protestant Reformation
- Reformation in England
- Scientific Revolution
- The Enlightenment
3. 2006 Silver Trade DBQ: Analysis of documents. Meaning/Importance, POV, Grouping.

Assignment:
Next Class (Wed/Thu) - Quiz Chapter 15 - World Commerce
Next Monday - Quiz Chapter 16 - Science & Religion
Next Wed/Thu - Test Unit 6: The Early Modern World
Neil deGrasse Tyson is an American astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, and science communicator.
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Friday, January 24, 2015
Quote: “An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr.

Learning Targets CH. 16 - Science & Religion:
- Examine the early modern roots of modern tension between religion and science
- Compare the Reformation movements in Europe and their significance
- Analyze the global spread of Christianity and the extent to which it syncretized with native traditions
- Expand the discussion of religious change to include religious movements in China, India, and the Islamic world
- Understand the reasons behind the Scientific Revolution in Europe, and why that movement was limited in other parts of the world
- Examine the implications of the Scientific Revolution for world societies 

Essential Questions:

1. Why did Christianity take hold in some places more than in others?
2. In what ways was the missionary message of Christianity shaped by the cultures of Asian and American peoples?
3. Compare the processes by which Christianity and Islam became world religions.
4. In what ways did the spread of Christianity, Islam, and modern science give rise to culturally based conflicts?
5. Based on Chapters 13 through 16, how does the history of Islam in the early modern era challenge a Eurocentric understanding of those centuries?

Agenda:
1. Andrew Marr's A History of the World: Plunder & Revolution
We will watch segments from two episodes.
We'll watch a segment and then discuss as a class.
  • How does it relate to Strayer's Unit 4?
  • What is the big picture?
  • Change Over Time?
  • World Historical Context?
  • Anything Marr's "Point of View" - that may be biased or influenced in some way?
Assignment:
Monday - Quiz Chapter 16 - Science & Religion
Next Wed/Thu - Test Unit 6: The Early Modern World