Chapter 19 & 20 - 2013 - Student Presentations

I will keep adding to these as I upload them. We had some pretty good presentations. You could use them to review for the test on Friday. Just remember, the information may not be 100% perfect. This is student generated content. So read with caution and compare to what we have learned and in class from Strayer.

India   India


China  China  China


Japan  Japan


Europe  Europe  Europe


Ottoman Empire  Ottoman Empire

European Colonization - A video skit by 6th period.





Also here is the power point presentation at this link: Japan Jeopardy




Simon Schama's A History of Britain - Episode 14 - Empire of Good Intentions

The British Empire in the 19th century was the largest the world had ever seen, and one of the most idealistic. Simon Schama reveals how, disastrously, the liberal politics and free-market economics that drove it unraveled  resulting in the Irish Potato Famine, and mutiny in India. By the early 20th century, nationalist movements around the globe had turned their back on the British 'workshop of the world'.

Andrew Marr's "The Making of Modern Britain" - Episode 1 The Dawn of a New Era

In the first of a six-part series, Andrew Marr revisits Britain at the dawn of the 20th century. He finds the country mourning the death of Queen Victoria; fighting an intractable war against the Boers in South Africa; enjoying the bawdy pleasures of music hall; and worrying about the physical and moral strength of the working class.

Agenda: Week of Monday, Feb. 25 - Friday, March 1, 2013

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez - Agenda
Unit 5: THE EUROPEAN MOMENT IN WORLD HISTORY 1750-1914
CH 19 Internal Troubles, External Threats: China, the Ottoman Empire, & Japan -and- CH 20 Colonial Encounters
Week at a Glance:
MON - Quiz CH 20; Student Presentation (or Duez will finish Africa)
TUE - Student Presentations
WED/TH - Student Presentations; Finish Ch 19 and 20 - India; Review 19 and 20
FRI - TEST CH 19 and 20
What will your WHAP T-Shirt be? It is time to start planning.
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LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 19 Targets:
• To make students aware of the refocusing of racism in the nineteenth-century West
• To examine the effects of Western dominance on the empires of Asia
• To explore the reasons behind the collapse of the Chinese and Ottoman empires
• To investigate the reasons for Japan’s rise to its position as an industrial superpower and to compare Japan’s experience with that of China 

Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 19 Essential Questions:
1. What differences can you identify in how China, the Ottoman Empire, and Japan experienced Western imperialism and confronted it? How might you account for those differences?
2. In what ways did the Industrial Revolution shape the character of nineteenth-century European imperialism?
3. “The response of each society to European imperialism grew out of its larger historical development and its internal problems.” What evidence might support this statement?
4. What accounts for the massive peasant rebellions of nineteenth-century China?
5. How did Western pressures stimulate change in China during the nineteenth century?
6. What lay behind the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century?
7. How did Japan’s historical development differ from that of China and the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth century?

Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?
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Monday, February 25, 2013
Quote: "Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

Agenda:
1. Do Now - Prep for the Quiz. Then Quiz Ch 20.
2. Student Presentations - Students will take notes during the presentations. They must note the 3 'main points' or 'main ideas' that the presentation focuses on during their description of their area (Europe, Africa, Ottoman Empire, India, Japan, China)
3. If extra time: Notes, Video, & Discussion  - "The Scramble for Africa."
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Tuesday, February 26, 2013
Quote"Advice is what we ask for when we already know the answer but wish we didn't." - Erica Jong

Agenda:
1. Do Now - Prep notes for student presentations.
2. Student Presentations - Students will take notes during the presentations. They must note the 3 'main points' or 'main ideas' that the presentation focuses on during their description of their area (Europe, Africa, Ottoman Empire, India, Japan, China)
What will your WHAP T-Shirt be? It is time to start planning.
-----------------------------------------
Wednesday, February 27 & Thursday, February 28, 2013
Quote"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace." - Jimi Hendrix

Agenda:
1. Student Presentations - Students will take notes during the presentations. They must note the 3 'main points' or 'main ideas' that the presentation focuses on during their description of their area (Europe, Africa, Ottoman Empire, India, Japan, China)
2. Notes, Video, & Discussion: Mughal Demise, Rule of Empire: India under the rule of Britain & Impact of Imperialism
3. Review Chapter 19 and 20.
The British Empire will see their fortunes shift in our next chapter.
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Friday, March 1, 2013
Quote: "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." - Winston Churchill

Agenda:
1. Test - Chapter 19 and 20. 
2. Read Ch 21 for Monday's Quiz. 1st half.
What will your WHAP T-Shirt be? It is time to start planning.

Notes, Targets, Video - Chapter 19 and 20

Notes for Chapter 19 and 20


Targets for Chapter 19
Targets for Chapter 20

Crash Course World History - Samurai, Daimyo, Matthew Perry and Nationalism

Crash Course World History - Nineteenth Century Imperialism 

Andrew Marr's History of the World - Industry (Covers topics like Opium War, Opening of Japan, and Scramble for Africa)

Yeah, we'll be seeing much more of Mr. Niall Ferguson in coming weeks. 

Playlist of all of Niall Ferguson's Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World
Historian and presenter Niall Ferguson takes us on a fascinating journey in both time and space to explore the impact of the British empire on the modern world. From the earliest British settlers in Virginia to the decline of the empire in the aftermath of the two World Wars, positive and negative aspects of the empire are illustrated through key events and players.

Niall Ferguson uses a wealth of original sources such as quotes, documents, film footage and photographs, as well as taking a contemporary look at key locations and drawing parallels with recent history, such as the USA's war against terrorism.

The series is highly entertaining, informative and thought-provoking, and provides an excellent and balanced overview of the British empire and its continuing legacy in the world.



Agenda: Week of Mon, Feb. 18 - Fri, Feb. 22, 2013

Advanced Placement World History with Mr. Duez - Agenda
Unit 5: THE EUROPEAN MOMENT IN WORLD HISTORY 1750-1914
CH 19 Internal Troubles, External Threats: China, the Ottoman Empire, & Japan -and- CH 20 Colonial Encounters
WEEK AT A GLANCE:
MON - No School.
TUE - Quiz Ch. 19; Introduction to Ch 19 China, Ottoman Empire, Japan.
WED/THUThe Opium War, Commodore Perry "Invades" Japan, Stanley Explores Africa's Congo & King Leopold Capitalizes - The Scramble for Africa. & Prep for Presentations.
FRIBritish India, Christianity in the East, Hinduism adoption. & Prep for Presentations.
"The Opening of Japan." This nineteenth-century Japanese woodblock print depicts Commodore Perry’s meeting with a Japanese official in 1853. It was this encounter that launched Japan on a series of dramatic changes that resulted in the country’s modernization and its emergence as one of the world’s major industrialized powers by the early twentieth century. (Bettmann/Corbis)
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Monday, February 18, 2013
Quote: “Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.”  ― AndrĂ© Gide
NO SCHOOL!
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Tuesday, February 19, 2013
Quote: "I don't know if it's good or bad that a Google search on "Big Bang Theory" lists the sitcom before the origin of the Universe." - Neil deGrasse Tyson @neiltyson

LEARNING TARGETS:
Chapter 19 Targets:
• To make students aware of the refocusing of racism in the nineteenth-century West
• To examine the effects of Western dominance on the empires of Asia
• To explore the reasons behind the collapse of the Chinese and Ottoman empires
• To investigate the reasons for Japan’s rise to its position as an industrial superpower and to compare Japan’s experience with that of China 

Chapter 20 Targets:
•  To examine the ways in which Europeans created their nineteenth-century empires
•  To consider the nineteenth-century development of racism as an outcrop of European feelings of superiority and to investigate the ways in which subject peoples were themselves affected by European racial categorization
•  To consider the extent to which the colonial experience transformed the lives of Asians and Africans
•  To define some of the distinctive qualities of modern European empires in relationship to earlier examples of empire 

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
Chapter 19 Essential Questions:
1. What differences can you identify in how China, the Ottoman Empire, and Japan experienced Western imperialism and confronted it? How might you account for those differences?
2. In what ways did the Industrial Revolution shape the character of nineteenth-century European imperialism?
3. “The response of each society to European imperialism grew out of its larger historical development and its internal problems.” What evidence might support this statement?
4. What accounts for the massive peasant rebellions of nineteenth-century China?
5. How did Western pressures stimulate change in China during the nineteenth century?
6. What lay behind the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century?
7. How did Japan’s historical development differ from that of China and the Ottoman Empire during the nineteenth century?

Chapter 20 Essential Questions:
1. Why were Asian and African societies incorporated into European colonial empires later than those of the Americas? How would you compare their colonial experiences?
2. In what ways did colonial rule rest upon violence and coercion, and in what ways did it elicit voluntary cooperation or generate benefits for some people?
3. Was colonial rule a transforming, even a revolutionary, experience, or did it serve to freeze or preserve existing social and economic patterns? What evidence can you find to support both sides of this argument?
4. Why might subject people choose to cooperate with the colonial regime? What might prompt them to rebel or resist?
5. How did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
6. How did cash-crop agriculture transform the lives of colonized peoples?
7. How were the lives of African women altered by colonial economies?
8. What impact did Western education have on colonial societies?
9. What were the attractions of Christianity within some colonial societies?
10. How and why did Hinduism emerge as a distinct religious tradition during the colonial era in India?
AGENDA:
1. Prep for Quiz Ch 19.
2. DO NOW after the quizIn what ways did the Industrial Revolution shape the character of nineteenth-century European imperialism?
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: Introduction to Chapter 19 and 20.
An American View of British Imperialism: In this American cartoon dating to 1882, the British Empire is portrayed as an octopus whose tentacles are already attached to many countries, while one tentacle is about to grasp still another one, Egypt. (The Granger Collection, New York)
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Wednesday, February 20, 2013 & Thursday, February 21, 2013
Quote: “Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure Science.” ― Edwin Hubble

Agenda:
1. Do Now QuestionWhat lay behind the decline of the Ottoman Empire in the nineteenth century?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: The Opium War, Commodore Perry "Invades" Japan, Stanley Explores Africa's Congo & King Leopold Capitalizes - The Scramble for Africa.
3. Presentation Prep: Students will work in their groups to prepare next week's student led presentations over Chapter 19 and 20.
The Imperial Durbar of 1903: To mark the coronation of British monarch Edward VII and his installation as the Emperor of India, colonial authorities in India mounted an elaborate assembly, or durbar. The durbar was intended to showcase the splendor of the British Empire, and its pageantry included sporting events; a state ball; a huge display of Indian arts, crafts, and jewels; and an enormous parade in which a long line of British officials and Indian princes passed by on bejeweled elephants. (Topham/The Image Works)
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Friday, February 22, 2013
Quote: “In wisdom gathered over time I have found that every experience is a form of exploration.” ― Ansel Adams

Agenda:
1. Do Now QuestionHow did the power of colonial states transform the economic lives of colonial subjects?
2. Notes, Video, Discussion: British India, Christianity in the East, Hinduism adoption.
3. Presentation Prep: Students will work in their groups to prepare next week's student led presentations over Chapter 19 and 20.

Next Week:
On Monday - Quiz for Chapter 20.
Then we will begin presentations starting with Europeans.
Test over CH. 19 and 20 is next Friday.

Targets - Chapter 19 - China, Japan, and Ottoman Empire

Click here to see the Targets for Chapter 19 - China, Japan, and Ottoman Empire.
Carving Up the Pie of China: In this French cartoon from the late 1890s, the Great Powers of the day (from left to right: Great Britain’s Queen Victoria, Germany’s Kaiser Wilhelm, Russia’s Tsar Nicholas II, a female figure representing France, and the Meiji emperor of Japan) participate in dividing China, while a Chinese figure behind them tries helplessly to stop the partition of his country. (Gianni Dagli Orti/The Art Archive)
click below to view the Targets for 19 embedded in this site:

Agenda for week of Feb 11 - Feb 15, 2013

World History Advanced Placement
Unit 5 - The European Moment, 1750-1914
Week at a Glance:
MON- Quiz; Introduction to the Industrial Revolution
TUE- DBQ - Industrial Revolution - working as a class cooperatively
W/TH- Impact of the Industrial Revolution; Independent & Full Class discussion of DBQ over Industrial Revolution
FRI- Free Response Question - DBQ - Industrial Revolution
The Iron Bridge crosses the River Severn in Shropshire, England. It was the first arch bridge in the world to be made of cast iron, a material which was previously too expensive to use for large structures.
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Monday, February 11, 2013
Quote: “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. The mind is everything. What we think we become.” - Buddha

Learning Targets:

• To explore the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution
• To root Europe’s Industrial Revolution in a global context
• To examine the question of why industrialization first “took off ” in Great Britain
• To heighten student awareness of both the positive and the negative effects of the Industrial Revolution
• To examine some of the ways in which nineteenth-century industrial powers exerted an economic imperialism over their nonindustrialized neighbors

Essential Questions:

1. What was revolutionary about the Industrial Revolution?
2. What was common to the process of industrialization everywhere, and in what ways did that process vary from place to place?
3. What did humankind gain from the Industrial Revolution, and what did it lose?
4. In what ways might the Industrial Revolution be understood as a global rather than simply a European phenomenon?

Agenda:

1. Quiz Chapter 18 - Revolutions of Industry. Students may use hand written notes.
2. Do Now Question after Quiz: Why did the Industrial Revolution begin in Britain?
3. Lecture, Discussion, & Video: Introduction to the Industrial Revolution. Why Britain & Europe? Impact on the planet. The birth of a new era.

Like he said.
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Tuesday, February 12, 2013
Quote: “When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” ― Wayne W. Dyer

Learning Targets:

• To explore the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution
• To root Europe’s Industrial Revolution in a global context
• To examine the question of why industrialization first “took off ” in Great Britain
• To heighten student awareness of both the positive and the negative effects of the Industrial Revolution
• To examine some of the ways in which nineteenth-century industrial powers exerted an economic imperialism over their nonindustrialized neighbors

Essential Questions:

1. What was revolutionary about the Industrial Revolution?
2. What was common to the process of industrialization everywhere, and in what ways did that process vary from place to place?
3. What did humankind gain from the Industrial Revolution, and what did it lose?
4. In what ways might the Industrial Revolution be understood as a global rather than simply a European phenomenon?

Agenda:

1. Do NowPick up DBQ Packet from the front of the room. Begin working on analyzing the documents and following the instructions on the packet.
2. In cooperative groups:
Analyze the prompt.
- Document Analysis. M-A-P (Meaning, Analysis, Point of View)
Group the documents
- Write the thesis
3. Full class discussion of each component. The class will create a single set and write it up on the white board.
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Wednesday, February 13, 2013 & Thursday, February 14, 2013
Quote“We are the cosmos made conscious and life is the means by which the universe understands itself.” ― Brian Cox

Learning Targets:

• To explore the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolution
• To root Europe’s Industrial Revolution in a global context
• To examine the question of why industrialization first “took off ” in Great Britain
• To heighten student awareness of both the positive and the negative effects of the Industrial Revolution
• To examine some of the ways in which nineteenth-century industrial powers exerted an economic imperialism over their nonindustrialized neighbors

Essential Questions:

1. What was revolutionary about the Industrial Revolution?
2. What was common to the process of industrialization everywhere, and in what ways did that process vary from place to place?
3. What did humankind gain from the Industrial Revolution, and what did it lose?
4. In what ways might the Industrial Revolution be understood as a global rather than simply a European phenomenon?

Agenda:

1. Do Now QuestionIn what ways might the Industrial Revolution be understood as a global rather than simply a European phenomenon?
2. Lecture, Discussion, Video on Industrial Revolution and Impact: How did the Industrial Revolution change the world? Also discuss capitalism & socialism -- two economic systems that see their roots in the IR
3. Self-analysis of last Friday's Timed Writing DBQ. Students will analyze their work with the rubric.
4. Students will work independently for 20 minutes on an Industrial Revolution DBQ. The remainder of the class will be a group discussion on unpacking and breaking down the DBQ:
Analyze the prompt.
- Document Analysis. M-A-P (Meaning, Analysis, Point of View)
Group the documents
- Write the thesis
Happy Valentine's Day.
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Friday, February 15, 2013
Quote“One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.” ― Carl Jung

Agenda:
1. Free Response Question - Timed Writing - Industrial Revolution DBQ.

Enjoy Monday and we'll see you Tuesday. Quiz over Chapter 19 on Tuesday.

Targets CH 18 - Revolutions of Industry

Targets CH 18 - Revolutions of Industry
The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes that occurred in the period from about 1760 to some time between 1820 and 1840. This transition included going from hand production methods to machines, new chemical manufacturing and iron production processes, improved efficiency of water power, the increasing use of steam power and development of machine tools. 

The transition also included the change from wood and other bio-fuels to coal. The Industrial revolution began in England and within a few decades spread to Western Europe and the United States.


The Industrial Revolution marks a major turning point in history; almost every aspect of daily life was influenced in some way. Most notably, average income and population began to exhibit unprecedented sustained growth. In the words of Nobel Prize winner Robert E. Lucas, Jr., "For the first time in history, the living standards of the masses of ordinary people have begun to undergo sustained growth ... Nothing remotely like this economic behavior has happened before".


Video for the Chapter (click below to view on this site):

1. BBC's The Industrial Revolution Why did the Industrial Revolution happen in 18th century Britain?
2. Crash Course World History: Coal, Steam, and the Industrial Revolution
3. Industrial Revolution Theme from London 2012 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony
4. Andrew Marr's History of the World: Age of Industry

Agenda: Week of Feb 4 - Feb 8, 2013

Advanced Placement World History
Unit 5: The European Moment, 1750 - 1914
Chapter 17: The Atlantic Revolutions and Their Echoes
Week at a Glance:
MON: Quiz Ch 17; Finish French Revolution
TUE: DBQ Analysis & POV; Haitian and Latin Revolutions
WED/THU: Final pointers on DBQ; Review CH 17; The Art of the French Revolution
FRI: DBQ Due in class written and final essay; TEST Chapter 17
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Napoleon "Crossing the Alps" by David
Monday, February 4, 2013
Quote: "In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on." - Robert Frost

Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality. How much violence is necessary or justifiable?
Essential Questions:
1. How did the issue of slavery show contradiction and complexity during the Atlantic Revolutions?
2. Do revolutions originate in oppression and injustice, in the weakening of political authorities, in new ideas, or in the activities of small groups of determined activists?
3. “The influence of revolutions endured long after they ended.” To what extent does this chapter support or undermine this idea?
4. In what ways did the Atlantic revolutions and their echoes give a new and distinctive 
shape to the emerging societies of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas?

Agenda:
1. Quiz Chapter 17
2. Finish French Revolution
 Storming of the Bastille and arrest of the Governor M. de Launay, July 14, 1789.  -Anonymous painter
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Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Quote: "The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases." - Carl Jung

Learning Targets:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality. How much violence is necessary or justifiable?
Essential Questions:
1. How did the issue of slavery show contradiction and complexity during the Atlantic Revolutions?
2. Do revolutions originate in oppression and injustice, in the weakening of political authorities, in new ideas, or in the activities of small groups of determined activists?
3. “The influence of revolutions endured long after they ended.” To what extent does this chapter support or undermine this idea?
4. In what ways did the Atlantic revolutions and their echoes give a new and distinctive 
shape to the emerging societies of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas?

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: What is your thesis statement for the DBQ? Which documents support slavery? Which oppose? Which documents are you using for evidence of Point of View?
2. Collaborative teamwork to prepare document based question for Friday. Meaning, Analysis, Point of View. Thesis. Evidence. Impact.
3. If time, review of French Revolution and introduce Haitian Revolution.
The Haitian Revolution - the first successful slave revolt in history.
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Wednesday, February 6, 2013 -and- Thursday, February 7, 2013
Quote: "Every man dies. Not every man really lives." - William Wallace

Learning Targets
:
• Understand the number and diversity of Atlantic revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how forces at work through the Enlightenment impacted them
• Explore the cross-pollination between revolutionary movements and compare their various causes and overall results
• Compare the real impact of the Atlantic revolutions on their citizens and understand the global impact of the revolutionary movement of the era.
• Consider the consequences of using violence to achieve liberty and equality. How much violence is necessary or justifiable?
Essential Questions:
1. How did the issue of slavery show contradiction and complexity during the Atlantic Revolutions?
2. Do revolutions originate in oppression and injustice, in the weakening of political authorities, in new ideas, or in the activities of small groups of determined activists?
3. “The influence of revolutions endured long after they ended.” To what extent does this chapter support or undermine this idea?
4. In what ways did the Atlantic revolutions and their echoes give a new and distinctive 
shape to the emerging societies of nineteenth-century Europe and the Americas?
French artist Jacques Louis David

Agenda:
1. DO NOW QUESTION: Make a chart comparing the North American, French, Haitian, and Spanish American revolutions. What categories of comparison would be most appropriate
to include?
2. Notes, Video, DiscussionHaitian Revolution
3. Notes, Video, Discussion: Latin American Revolution
4. Notes, Video, and Discussion: The Art of the French Revolution: impact of the artist Jacque Louis David on the French Revolution and French propaganda.
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Friday, February 7, 2013
Quote: "All the art of living lies in a fine mingling of letting go and holding on." - Henry Ellis

Agenda:
1. Turn in DBQ
2. Test Chapter 17

Quiz on Tuesday over Chapter 18 - Industrial Revolution.
We will write the CCOT over the Industrial Revolution next Friday.